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Archive for March, 2009

The Bohemian Quartet at Providence College

Tuesday, March 31st, 2009
http://www.arts.ri.gov/images/BQ1.JPG 
Dear Friends of The Bohemian Quartet,
 
I cordially invite you to the Bohemian Quartet’s last concert of the season. We will be performing in The Ryan Concert Hall part of the Smith Arts Center at Providence College this coming Saturday April 4th at 7pm. This is a free concert made partly possible by a generous grant from RISCA (Rhode Island State Council on the Arts). We will be especially presenting a new set of Polish Gypsy tunes preceded by a short talk about the process of collecting and arranging these exciting songs.
 
We hope to see many of you on Saturday.
 
Sincerely,
 
Stan Renard
 
Violinist & Director of the Bohemian Quartet
P.S. We suggest that you enter the campus using the Eaton Street Gate. The Smith Arts Center will be on your left. You may link to a map of campus in a PDF format (below). The Smith Arts Center is number 44. Thank you.
 
You may find directions @ http://www.providence.edu
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Office/Studio for rent at The Steelyard

Tuesday, March 31st, 2009

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Sign: Language at MWM

Tuesday, March 31st, 2009

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Multi-Media Events from Brown’s 411 Listserve

Tuesday, March 31st, 2009

==========================Summary==========================

DC401 April Meeting – NickD on DeDECTed – Wednesday, April 1

Lecture: Songsmith: Automatic Accompaniment for Vocal Melodies – Thursday,

April 2

Symposium: Embodiment & Mobility (RISD D+M) – Friday, April 3

Lecture: Chris Salter – Music and the Body – Friday, April 3

Dance/Music/Play – Friday, April 3rd – Saturday, April 4th

Upcoming:

Concert: Willits, Gomberg, and Drums and Circuits – Friday, April 10

 

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Details

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DC401 April Meeting – NickD on DeDECTed

Wednesday, April 1

5:30-7pm

AS220, 115 Empire St

April Fool’s day brings us a treat as NickD presents on the deDECTed project.

DECT or Digital Enhanced Cordless Telecommunications, is a standard used for

various data communications devices, most commonly phones but also mobile

POS systems. Mostly deployed in Europe and making leaps and boundsin the US

DECT was the recent focus of some hackers in Germany who sought out to

create a Linux stack and driver for DECT hardware. With this hardware you

can intercept DECT communications where encryption is optional, including

cordless phones.

At this talk Nick will talk in details about the Dedected project, it’s

goals and progress as well as demonstrate a live intercept of a DECT phone

call and conversation.

info: http://dc401.org/site/

(more…)

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National Arts Advocacy Day, 3/31/9

Tuesday, March 31st, 2009

Today, March 31, 2009, hundreds of dedicated arts supporters from across the country

have come together in Washington, DC for National Arts Advocacy Day, a

united effort to tell Capitol Hill how important culture is to our

communities, how much arts education means to our children, and how

much the arts improve our daily lives. 83 National CoSponsors have

helped us shape this united arts message to Congress.

[http://capwiz.com/artsusa/utr/1/CBQGKECEEL/AWVGKEDNZC/3121504021]

This year, Arts Advocacy Day will be busier than ever, and not only

because of the near-record number of advocates attending. Americans

for the Arts has once again been asked by House Interior Appropriations

Subcommittee Chairman Norm Dicks (D-WA) to organize a hearing on the

arts on Arts Advocacy Day. We are very pleased that our President

& CEO Robert Lynch will be joined by several other national leaders

in the arts, including Artistic Director of Jazz at Lincoln Center

Wynton Marsalis, GRAMMY(R)-nominated singer-songwriter Josh Groban,

GRAMMY(R)-Award winning singer Linda Ronstadt, and business leader and

Philadelphia Federal Reserve Board member Jeremy Nowak, to testify at

the hearing. The Subcommittee is expected to webcast the hearing live

starting at 10:30 a.m. Eastern Time. A link to the webcast can be

found on the House Appropriations Committee

website:http://capwiz.com/artsusa/utr/1/CBQGKECEEL/OCWMKEDNZD/3121504021

Even if you’re not able to join us in Washington, you can still

participate in Arts Advocacy Day by asking your Members of Congress to

support the arts. By visiting our E-Advocacy Center, you’ll be able to

send a message directly to your Representative and Senators telling

them why the arts are important to you and your community. We’ve

provided bullet points covering our eleven key Arts Advocacy Day

issues, which you can use in the sample letter that we’ve drafted for

you. We also encourage you to write your own unique story to illustrate

the importance of the arts to your community. Using the E-Advocacy

Center, you can create and send your letter to Congress in less than

two minutes. We urge you to send your message to Congress today to

coincide with our office visits to the Hill. Click here to send your

message:

http://capwiz.com/artsusa/utr/1/CBQGKECEEL/GVZLKEDNZE/3121504021 Need more information? Browse the 2009 Congressional Arts Handbook for

issue briefs, voting records, latest arts research and trends, relevant

Congressional committees, and Congressional contact lists:

www.americansforthearts.org/aad/handbook Thank you for your continued support of the arts! Together, we are

making a difference!

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Providence Artist MAGALY PONCE at the COLO COLO Gallery

Tuesday, March 31st, 2009

http://www.arts.ri.gov/images/MagalyPonceArtExhibit.JPG  MAGALY PONCE: CAPE VERDIAN IMAGINARIES
April 1-27, 2009
Opening Reception Friday, April 3 from 6-8 pm
http://www.resextensa.net/
 
At the  COLO COLO Gallery
25 Centre Street
New Bedford, MA 02740
(508) 496–4718
Gallery hours: Tuesday – Thursday  12:00 – 5:00 pm
Wednesday – Friday  3:00 – 6:00 pm
Saturday  12:00 – 6:00 pm and by appointment

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Mudstone Studios Grand Opening

Monday, March 30th, 2009

Saturday, April 18 5-9 PM

30 Cutler St, Warren, RI 02885

Featuring Members: Ellen Blomgren, John Boland, Davison Bolster, Will Heacock, Michele James Hurley, Allison Newsome, Nina Hope Pfanstiehl, Leigh-Ann Ramieri, Dick Sylvia, Pat Warwick, Jeanne Loewenstein Wells, The BEad House Studio, and Warren Clayworks

 

http://www.mudstonestudios.com/

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RISD Public Engagement

Monday, March 30th, 2009

 

Monday, March 30, 2009
 
logo
 

Welcome back, RISD!

As the school year enters the final push, RISD|Public Engagement is making its own push to reach new corners of the RISD and Providence community.

Please take a moment to consider forwarding this e-bulletin along to a handful of friends and colleagues who you think would enjoy learning more about how RISD is connecting art and design to the public good. 

Thanks and happy reading. – The Office of Public Engagement

RISD | Public Engagement publishes this periodic bulletin to help connect RISD and the local community with information, opportunities and resources.  Visit our website and our latest blog postings for more information about public engagement at RISD.
 

 

Engage with RISD | Public Engagement



Final week to view Tricks of the Eye exhibit
CURATOR TOUR: THURSDAY APRIL 2ND
Curator Susan Sakash will host the final guided tour of the Tricks of the Eye exhibit on Thursday April 2nd from 12:00 – 12:30pmPlease RSVP via email by Wednesday 5pm.

Read Susan’s recent blog post about the nature of teaching exhibitions here. Tricks of the Eye poster

Ask to remember. Invite to act.
WHERE: CIT Building, 169 Weybosset Street, 2nd Floor, Providence, RI
WHAT: Exhibition highlighting the ways that local and national artists are responding to the shifting landscapes that backdrop and underline our actions and intentions as publicly and socially engaged citizens. 

Featured artists include: The National Bitter Melon Council, John Malpede and the Los Angeles Poverty Department, and RISD Public Engagement Associates Leon Johnson and Pam Hall.

For more photos of the exhibition and details on the featured projects, visit the Public Engagement exhibitions page.

+++++
BEEHIVE COLLECTIVE AT RISD 

Car Culture Beehive Poster April 10 – 11th

As part of the Public Engagement Associates program, founding member Juan Bee will give a drawing workshop for teens followed by a public presentation at the Tap Room on Friday April 10th.

Beehive Collective

Friday night’s presentation is free and open to the public.When: Friday, April 10, 6:30 – 8pm
Where: Tap Room, 4th Floor, Memorial Hall, 55 Angell Street, Providence, RI
 

Friday, April 10, 6:30 – 8pmTap Room, 4th Floor, Memorial Hall, 55 Angell Street, Providence, RI Pam Hall - April 27th – 29th
Pam Hall returns to RISD as a visiting artist/scholar to RISD classes. The Office of Public Engagement will also host a faculty coffee with Hall on Tuesday April 28th at 9:30 am.

The Beehive Collective and Pam Hall are available to meet with students, faculty, community members and classes during their residency. Please contact Susan Sakash to set up an engagement.

On Campus
 


Behind the Scenes Look:
The Making of 
Waltz with Bashir
 

Waltz with Bashir
Artist Talk and Screening with David Polonsky 

When: Monday, April 13
           6:30 PM  Artist Talk
           7:15 PM Screening  
           of Waltz with Bashir
Where:
RISD Auditorium, 17 Canal Street   

Monday, April 13           6:30 PM  Artist Talk           7:15 PM Screening             of RISD Auditorium, 17 Canal Street   Brown and RISD faculty and students welcome

For more information on David Polonsky’s residency at Brown RISD Hillel and a full list of sponsors, visit here.

++++

Art+History Exhibition Opens Tuesday March 31st
Art+History openingArt+History is an exhibition and community programming series about
the processes of interpreting history. The John Nicholas Brown Center
for Public Humanities and Cultural Heritage commissioned Carla
Herrera-Prats and Jill Slosburg-Ackerman to make new work influenced
by the historic Nightingale-Brown House, home to five generations of
the Brown family and now to the JNBC. 

Curated by Meg Rotzel and Rosemary Branson Gill, Art+History is open to the public 3/31-10/2/2009.

++++

The Black Lavender Experience The Black Lavender Experience
April 2-5, 2009
Theatre and Conversation sparked by the work of Queer Playwrights

Sponsored by Brown University and the Africana Studies Program

Theatre and Conversation sparked by the work of Queer PlaywrightsSponsored by Brown University and the Africana Studies Program

SPECIAL EVENT: Friday April 3rd, 4PM
PRODUCTION, PERFORMANCE, PRODUCT
The politics of writing and performing
Blackness/Queerness with Staceyann Chin,
Andre Lancaster (Freedom Train Productions)
and Ernest Hardy (The LA Times/Redbone Press)

UNLESS OTHERWISE NOTED, ALL EVENTS TAKE PLACE AT
RITES AND REASON THEATRE · CHURCHILL HOUSE
155 ANGELL STREET PROVIDENCE RI
FOR MORE INFORMATION:
BLACKLAV.COM
BLACKLAVENDER@BROWN.EDU

Events Around Town 

Ray Materson Artist Talk at as220 

 

When:  Thursday April 2, 2009 4pm
Where: as220 performance space
Contact Info: Cheryl at as220.org

Thursday April 2nd, Ray Materson, will be visiting Broad Street Studio, AS220′s Youth Outreach Program. Ray is visiting youth at the downtown building and will also present his work to the youth at the Rhode Island Training School, Rhode Island’s Juvenile Detention Facility. This talk will be free, open to the public and undoubtedly fascinating.Queen Elizabeth, Ray Materson
 
Ray Materson is a nationally renowned, self-taught artist who found inspiration in a pair of socks while in prison. During the first year of his 15 year sentence for drug-related offenses, Ray traded some cigarettes for a pair of socks, secured a sewing needle from a prison guard and started stitching. Today, Materson spends 40 to 60 hours of steady work to create his marvelous embroideries. Art, he says, has changed him. “My art form has become a very dear friend to me.” For more information visit Ray Materson’s website.

Resources/Opportunities   

Artist in Residence Program – Somerville, MA 

March 31st, 2009 deadline! To apply, visit here.
In order to support the creative process, Willoughby and Baltic offers
a 6 month residency for two emerging artists. Each artist is granted a
free, non-living shared studio space and a small material stipend. The
studio is complete with free wi-fi and access to electronic assembly
tools and model making equipment, a machine shop, and a woodshop. The residency will commence on May 1st and end on October 31st, 2009.

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Summer 2009 Fellowships Available in Rhode Island with the Community HIV/AIDS Mobilization Project (CHAMP)

 

Prevention Research Advocacy Fellow & Communications Fellow
** stipends available to qualified applicants

** see Careers in the Common Good for more information++++

SCAPEGOAT architecture/landscape/political economy | call for contributors

SCAPEGOAT is a tri-annual journal that attends to both physical manifestations of and cultural and theoretical influences on design. It brings together critical reviews of contemporary practices, historical research and theoretical inquiry.Through architecture, landscape architecture, and urbanism, the journal engages mechanisms operating above, below, and behind these disciplines, such as infrastructure, governance, regional planning, land speculation, and militarization.

The journal is published in Toronto with limited print distribution
and made freely available on the internet. The first three issues
focus on the themes listed below, and we encourage submissions related
to these topics.

Issue o1: PROPERTY (September 2009)
This debut issue will examine the themes of property and its attendant
political economy within architectural, landscape, and urban design. We
hope to include a large number of ongoing works that engage the city
as a site of struggle. Submissions for this issue are due to the editors by June 1, 2009.

Feature Essays (5000-8000 words)
Short Essays (2000-3000 words)
Projects & Proposals (approx. 1000 words + images)
Reviews (1000-2000 words)

For submissions and inquires, contact the SCAPEGOAT editorial board.
++++

$2,000 Multicultural Award for Arts Unite Exhibit – April 3rd Deadline!
Tricks of the Eye poster
All Rhode Island Artists are welcome to submit their work to this exhibition which reflects a heritage which is unique to each of us. For more information and to download a prospectus, visit the Pawtucket Arts Collaborative website.++++

REMINDER: AIGA Design Series: Design As A Social Agent
The Next Generation
Saturday, April 4, 2:15 pm @
The Institute of Contemporary Art
Organized in partnership with the Berwick Research Institute

Tricks of the Eye poster
Shepard Fairey’s practice has blown open the ways that emerging artists and designers think about content, form, and message. Hear what the next generation of artists have learned, adapted, or rejected from Fairey’s work and where it is leading them.
Designer Elliott Earls will interview Boston-based artists including Brian Butler, a representative from Goldenstash, Dana Woulfe, and Kenji Nakayama.


++++**SUSTAINABILITY LEADERSHIP PROGRAM: APPLICATIONS NOW BEING ACCEPTED**  Application Deadline: April 13

The seventh annual:
URBAN SUSTAINABLE DESIGN STUDIO
June 16-August 12, 2009
Chicago, IL

Complete program information: http://www.foresightstudio.org/usds

TO APPLY
To download an application:
http://www.foresightdesign.org/usds/application.php

CONTACT
usds@foresightdesign.org

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
USDS is a program of the Foresight Design Initiative, a multifaceted
nonprofit organization focused on fostering a more sustainable Chicago.
http://www.foresightdesign.org+++++

Get Engaged


· Providence Agencies:
RISD | Public Engagement’s web site provides an updated listing of community organizations that are interested in working with the RISD community. 

· Our Blog: RISD | Public Engagement’s blog is a place where we document what we learn about what’s happening on campus, in Providence, and around the world. It’s also where we post the most up to date scoop about what’s new!· At the Swearer Center: The Swearer Center now has an Economic Crisis website which will be updated regularly with events, links, and information on what folks can do.

The now has an Economic Crisis website which will be updated regularly with events, links, and information on what folks can do.

    vol: 2 no: 16
 
banner
Contents
RISD | Public Engagement Events
On Campus
Events Around Town
Resources/Opportunities
Get Engaged
Community Profile
RISD in the News


Community Profile:
Rhode Island Campus Compact 

Rhode Island Campus Compact


Rhode Island Campus Compact (RICC)is a statewide coalition of colleges and universities committed to teaching the values of civic engagement and public leadership. Rhode Island Campus Compact actively promotes public and community service as vital components of higher education. Through innovative student, faculty and institutional participation in service, higher education can meet its public trust to inspire an active, responsible and committed citizenry while helping to address community needs. 

++++

AmeriCorps*VISTA member recruitment for 2009-2010!

Rhode Island Campus Compact seeks recent college graduates to serve a year of national service. 

VISTAs serve as community service and service learning coordinators on campuses and in schools to better align resources with low-income communities. 

To find out more information, contact Sonia Ferria, AmeriCorps*VISTA Leader @ 401.427.6946       

Help grow our network! 

Be our Facebook friend by visiting us here.

Forward this message onto a friend or colleague.

Join Our Mailing List

Letting Our Story Speak From Its Pages
 Final Opportunity
to Participate!
 


Deadline for final work has been extended to Friday April 3rd. 

Pick up materials at the Office of Multicultural Affairs (OMA).

Contact Patrice Payne for more details.

Letting Our Story Speak From Its Pages is a community art project by MAT grad student Patrice Payne. The project gives students, faculty, and staff an opportunity to document, share, and voice how being at RISD has affected them socially, intellectually, and artistically.

is a community art project by MAT grad student Patrice Payne. The project gives students, faculty, and staff an opportunity to document, share, and voice how being at RISD has affected them socially, intellectually, and artistically.Participants may create their stories using either written text, imagery, or both.

Funded by: Rhode Island Campus Compact, Raise Your Voice Presidential Civic Engagement Fund

RISD | Public Engagement is located on the 2nd Floor of the CIT Building, 169 Weybosset Street.
Office Phone: 401-427-6906, Fax: 401-454-6559, Website: http://www.risdpublicengagement.net.
Peter Hocking, Director, phocking@g.risd.edu and Susan Sakash, Program Coordinator VISTA ssakash@risd.edu
 
  Small
Print
The BULLETIN of RISD | Public Engagement is a publication of the Rhode Island School of Design’s Office of Public Engagement. It is sent to students, local community members, and various College personnel.  We have an open editorial policy and will post information about any legal event, program, or resource that is sponsored by RISD or a collaborating partner. Events listed in the BULLETIN are not by virtue of their inclusion endorsed by the Office of Public Engagement or Rhode Island School of Design. The editor of the BULLETIN reserves the right to deny inclusion of any posting.
RISD Public Engagement | 169 Weybosset Street | CIT, 2nd Floor | Providence | RI | 02902

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Embodiment & Mobility. A Digital+Media Symposium

Monday, March 30th, 2009

Embodiment & Mobility. A Digital+Media Symposium on Friday, April 3rdcomplete info at: http://dm.risd.edu/news/2009/03/embodiment-mobility-a-digitalmedia- symposium-on-april-3rd/This is a small symposium bringing together the work of media artists and researchers

who are interested in notions of embodiment and/or mobility and who we have the

pleasure to have with us at the Digital + Media Department at this very moment.

The Symposium Embodiment & Mobility takes place on Friday, April 3rd on the 4th floor

of the CIT building (see below). We will have a morning session starting at 9:30, the

afternoon session will start after lunch at 2:30 and finish around 5pm. We will then have

drinks at a newly-opened D+M student curated exhibition across the road.

At 6pm Chris Salter will give a talk as part of the “Music and Body” Colloquium at Brown’s

Meme program with whom we are glad to co-organize Chris Salter’s contribution and

some of you might want to join this event.

We will round off the evening with a dinner at a nearby affordable restaurant (own

expense).

This symposium is free and open to the public. However we ask you to reserve your

space with Sue Mazzucco at digital@risd.edu. Thank you!

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Events at Brown University

Monday, March 30th, 2009

Featured Events

 

Monday 30 March
Romano Prodi: Is there a New Role for Europe in Today’s World?
Romano Prodi, former prime minister of Italy and Brown University Professor-at-Large, will deliver a Stephen A. Ogden Jr. ’60 Memorial Lecture on International Affairs today. Prodi’s address, titled “Is There a New Role for Europe in Today’s World?,” will be introduced by President Ruth J. Simmons. Prime Minister Prodi will accept audience questions following his remarks. This event begins at 4 p.m. in Salomon Center for Teaching, De Ciccio Family Auditorium.



 

Tuesday 31 March
Space: The Next Arms Race?
More than fifty years after the space age began, fundamental questions regarding the nature of space remain unanswered. Is the final frontier to be the new battleground for an arms race, or a global commons of peaceful cooperation where no one nation dominates? Are space-based weapons essential to protecting U.S. military and economic power, or should outer space be limited to peaceful uses in which civil and military distinctions can be maintained? These questions and others will be addressed by a panel of scholars, moderated by James Head, professor of geological sciences. This event begins at 4 p.m. in the Joukowsky Forum, Watson Institute, 111 Thayer St.

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News from the RI Film Collaborative

Monday, March 30th, 2009

The Southeast New England (SENE) Film, Music &Arts Festival debuts April 2-5 in Providence. This unique new festival will

feature over 60 feature and short films including some World, U.S. and New

England premieres. More than 60 filmmakers from around the world will be in

attendance.

The festival will open on Thursday, April 2 with their Gala Music & Art

Party at Kay Studios in East Providence with music by Weird Beards and a

sneak preview of the festival’s upcoming films.

Highlighted at this year’s festival is “America’s Lost Band”, a film that

documents The Remains who toured with the Beatles and appeared on Ed

Sullivan before breaking up. The Remains will reunite to perform live after

the film.

(more…)

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News from the Blackstone Valley

Monday, March 30th, 2009

 

 BVTC_CVTHeader 

 Weekend Update in the Blackstone Valley     3/27/09 – 4/2/09

Celebrate French Culture

 

  • Saturday, March 28, 7 pm, Franco-Fete, dancing to French tunes, Le Foyer, Pawtucket

 

 In Our Museums & Galleries
  • Thursday, March 26 – Sunday, March 29 – Exhibit: Documents that Highlight Rhode Island’s Involvement in the Slave Trade at Museum of Work and Culture
  • Sunday, March 29 Free for All Sunday at Slater Mill 11:00 am – 3:00 pm
  • Sunday, March 29, Opening Reception Four Person Show, Rhode Island Water Color Society, 1:00 pm – 4:00 pm. Exhibit through April 16.

DestinationAward 

Rhode Island Water Color Society in Pawtucket

       
Community Events
 

 

KAB
River Cleanup


River Cleanup, Sunday, March 29
8:30 am – 12:00 pm

Location: Central Falls Landing, Broad Street & Madeira Avenue, Central Falls
In partnership with the Blackstone River Watershed Council 

Blackstone Watershed Council

 

Look for Signs of Spring at Audubon Society’s Powder Mill Ledges in North Smithfield
ASRI 
Visit the Powder Mill Ledges in North Smithfield and take stroll along the trails looking for the first signs of the season.   Visit ASRI.org for more information and Audubon events.

 

DestinationAward

 Saturday, March 28 9:00 am – 1:00 pm

Four Corners Community Chapel, 200 Angell Road, Cumberland, RI 
For more information, click here or contact Emily Soergel at Keep Blackstone Valley Beautiful
401-724-2200.
Arts & Entertainment
 

theatre works

Theatre Works Presents Tenneesee Williams Classic 

Friday, March 27th –   

Sunday, April 5, 2009 

Theatre Works presents Tenneesee Williams classic, The The Glass Menagerie. Click here for performance times and ticket information.

 

 

For Dining Options in the Blackstone Valley Visit
dine blackstone
 

RockinforHunger 

Saturday, March 28, 2009
6:30 pm


A concert event for those in need at the Twin River Event Center. Click here for more information.  To purchase tickets please go to www.rockinforhunger.com. Tickets are $15. 
 

Event Listings 

Visit our event calendar for more listings eventblackstone.com   

If you want your event listed submit online at eventblackstone.com or

 

 

Support Blackstone Valley Tourism Council Programs

good search 

Use Good Search for your Search Engine and support the Blackstone Valley Tourism Council.

 
       
   
   
Blackstone Valley Tourism Council | 175 Main Street | Pawtucket | RI | 02860

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41 available as download and rental

Monday, March 30th, 2009

  

Dear Friends,

 We’re very pleased to announce that 41, the award-winning documentary created by Christian de Rezendes and Christian O’Neill, has now been made available as both a download and a downloadable rental. If you’ve never seen the film before or would like to own it or rent the film these new options provide quick, affordable ways to do that, at only $9.99 for the Download and only $3.99 for a 3-day Downloadable Rental. Please visit http://www.nehst.com and check out the film’s website, http://www.41themovie.com, for more info!

 For those of you who may be new to the story of 41, this film tells the remarkable story of 18-year-old Nick O’Neill, the youngest victim of the one of the largest nightclub fires in U.S. history, and of his family and friends, who find the strength to carry on thanks to their belief that he continues to communicate with them from the Other Side. Dealing with issues of mediumship, synchronicity and physical evidence of the paranormal, 41 shows us how a local community, brought together by tragedy, found the hope and faith to go on. The story of Nicky, the Station Nightclub Fire’s youngest victim, sheds light on how faith was central to the reconstruction of many lives. The documentary takes us through Nick’s life before the fire – as a young actor, writer and musician. After the tragedy, a local theater troupe brought to life a play written by Nick in the months leading up to his death. Since then, thousands around New England believe, that even after his death, Nick has guided them with spiritual messages of love and inspiration. 41 captures both the tale of one town’s deep loss and the faith they gain through the grieving process. Friends, family, and community members have been united by Nick’s passing and brought together through his spiritual presence. For this community, the number 41 turns up in uncanny ways which leads them to believe that Nick is communicating with them even after he passed. While the film focuses on the loss of the youngest victim of the fire, it also lends itself to the spiritual nature of possibilities and hope within a community. The filmmakers focused on their own deep loss but more importantly used Nick as a narrative tool.

 Since its completion in 2007, the film has earned numerous accolades and has received acclaim from reviewers, including this 5-star review from Film Threat.com: http://www.filmthreat.com/index.php?section=reviews&Id=10052

 The film has been also been featured in festivals around North America, including the Director’s Chair Film Festival (NYC), the Bare Bones Film Festival (OK), the Woods Hole, Northampton and MassBay Film Festivals (MA) and the Blue Mountain Film Festival (Ontario), where it won the prize for Best Narrative Documentary.

 The project was co-Directed by Christian DeRezendes and Nick’s older brother Christian O’Neill and was highly collaborative in many respects, beginning with the over 100 hours of raw footage taken to complete the film. 41 also brings together a host of Rhode Island-based artists and a score composed by both Nick and Los-Angeles-based composer Michael Teoli. Consulting on the film are a number of internationally regarded figures including Academy and Emmy Award winning editor Tom Ohanian, co-creator of the Avid Media Composer, renowned medium Robert Brown, author of We Are Eternal, and Dr. Gary Schwartz, author of The Afterlife Experiments. NEHST Studios is a diversified film production, financing and distribution company that integrates the most powerful trends in entertainment and technology. NEHST Studios is headed up by industry veteran Larry Meistrich, producer of Sling Blade and You Can Count on Me and founder of indie film studio Shooting Gallery.

 

 

Thank you,

Nehst Studios

 

 

 

 

 

NEHST Studios is a diversified film production, financing and distribution company that integrates the most powerful trends in entertainment and technology. NEHST Studios is headed up by industry veteran Larry Meistrich – producer of Sling Blade and You Can Count on Me and founder of indie film studio Shooting Gallery.
Nehst Media Enterprises
545 8TH AVENUE, SUITE 401
NEW YORK, NEW YORK 10018
TEL: (201) 941.4677 FAX: (917) 591-6813

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Common Fence Point Music Series, in Portsmouth

Monday, March 30th, 2009

Greetings folks, if you can come, reserve your tickets now for a very special show at the Common Fence Point Music Series, in Portsmouth, RI Saturday, April 18th.  This exciting variety show of traditional folk songs, old time string band gospel music, and percussive dance will include seven peformers: Elwood Donnelly, Aubrey Atwater, Cathy Clasper-Torch, Kevin Doyle, John and Heidi Cerrigione, and Uriah Donnelly.  Here’s a YouTube link to check us out!  www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ql5yPys3fFYSee more details below as well as other upcoming shows including appearances in Springfield, MA; Arkansas; Minnesota; and the Rhode Island Folk Festival May 9th!  For listings into 2010, please visit our website where you can also read more about us, look at photos and videos, download songs, and much more.  Thanks and happy spring to you all!  Peace, Aubrey and Elwood
www.atwater-donnelly.com
Atwater-Donnelly Traditional American Folk Music and Dance

JERIMOTH HILL
(Atwater-Donnelly, Cathy Clasper-Torch, John and Heidi Cerrigione, Uriah Donnelly, and Kevin Doyle)
Sat., April 18, 2009
Common Fence Music
Common Fence Music Community Hall
933 Anthony Road
Portsmouth, RI
8 pm
$20
www.commonfencemusic.org
ATWATER-DONNELLY DUO
Sun., April 19, 2009
Mattunes House Concert
Historic Downtown
Springfield, MA
1:30 pm
$25 includes concert and gourmet meal and dessert
(413) 746-1656 or 433-2350
mattunes@verizon.net
www.mattunesmusic.com

ATWATER-DONNELLY DUO
April 23-25, 2009
Dulcimer Jamboree
Ozark Folk Center
Mountain View, AR
(870) 269-3851
www.ozarkfolkcenter.com
workshops and concerts
ATWATER-DONNELLY BAND
(with Cathy Clasper-Torch, Kevin Doyle, Heidi and John Cerrigione, and Ruby May, Evelyn, and Samuel Miller)
Thurs.,April 30, 2009
Providence Performing Arts Center
Providence, RI
9:30-11 am
Bank of America Arts Showcase Concert for 2000 RI middle school students

ATWATER-DONNELLY DUO
Fri.,May 1, 2009
Myles Reif Performing Arts Center
Concert located at the Davies Theater Itasca Community College
1859 Highway 169 East
Grand Rapids, MN
7:30 pm
admission $15 adults/$14 seniors/$8 students
(281) 327-5780
www.reifcenter.org
ATWATER-DONNELLY DUO
Sat.,May 2, 2009
Dulcimer Day in Duluth
First United Methodist Church
230 E. Skyline Parkway
Duluth, MN
wendyupnorth@yahoo.com
www.dulcimersinduluth.com

ATWATER-DONNELLY TRIO with The Late Bloomers and the Star Creek Ceili Band
May 9-10, 2009
The Rhode Island Folk Festival
Litttle Rhody Vasa Park
10 Boswell Trail
Foster, RI
Saturday session 9 am -6 pm
Evening concert 7:30-10:30 pm
$15 adult/$10 children under 12 for day or evening session
$25 adult/$15 children under 12 for both sessions
Sunday jam session 1-5 pm, donations
rifolkfestival@notaol.com
www.rifolkfestival.org
(401) 392-1322
workshops and concerts
ATWATER-DONNELLY DUO
Sat., May 16, 2009
Evening Concert
St. John’s Church
3 Trumbull Place (Top of the Green)
North Haven, CT
7:30 pm
(203) 239-0156
$15 adults/$5 kids under 12
www.stjohns-northhaven.org
mlincoln@stjohns-northhaven.org

ATWATER-DONNELLY DUO
Sun., May 17, 2009
Church Service
St. John’s Church
3 Trumbull Place (Top of the Green)
North Haven, CT
10 am
(203) 239-0156
www.stjohns-northhaven.org
mlincoln@stjohns-northhaven.org
Aubrey and Elwood will participate in the service
ATWATER-DONNELLY BAND
w/Cathy Clasper-Torch and Kevin Doyle
Fri., May 22, 2009
Fundraiser for Fort Taber Historical Society
Pulaski Auditorium
Pulaski School
1097 Braley Road
New Bedford, MA
7:30 pm
$10
(508) 990-0457
www.forttaber.org

ATWATER-DONNELLY DUO
Sun., May 24, 2009
Annual Cronan Fund Concert
Barrington Public Library
281 County Road
Barrington, RI
2-3 pm
free to the public
(401) 247-1920
www.barringtonlibrary.org

ATWATER-DONNELLY TRIO
Sat., May 30, 2009
The Vanilla Bean
Rtes. 44 ,169 , & 97
Pomfret, CT
8 pm
$15
www.thevanillabeancafe.com
(860) 928-1562
ATWATER-DONNELLY TRIO with other performers TBA
Fri., June 5, 2009
A Celtic Sojourn
The Boston Sessions Series
WGBH-FM
One Guest St.
Boston, MA
Live sessions with invited guests 7-8:30 pm
Broadcast later on WGBH-FM
www.wgbh.org
(617) 300-2347 (studio)
(617) 300-2000 (main)

ATWATER-DONNELLY DUO
Sat., June 6, 2009
Sustainable Living Festival
Apeiron Institute for Sustainable Living
451 Hammet Road
Coventry, RI
A-D performs 1-1:50 pm  (festival runs Sat 10 am-8 pm and Sun 10 am-6 pm)
Tickets Saturday $25, Sunday $20, combo $40, kids free
(401) 397-3430/228-7930
www.apeiron.org
ATWATER-DONNELLY DUO
June 7-13, 2009
32nd Annual Appalachian Family Folk Week
Hindman Settlement School
Hindman, KY
(606) 785-5475
www.hindmansettlement.org
JERIMOTH HILL
(Atwater-Donnelly, Cathy Clasper-Torch, John and Heidi Cerrigione, and Uriah Donnelly)
Sat., June 27, 2009
2000th Anniversay Celebration of St. Paul

St. Paul’s Church, 116 Danielson Pike
Foster, RI
2 pm concert
(401) 647-3664
admission prices TBA
refreshments/food will be available
indoor location or under tent, if rain
ATWATER-DONNELLY DUO
Sun.,July 5, 2009
Summer Concert Series
East Ferry Memorial Square
Jamestown, RI
6:30-8 pm
free
(401) 423-7260
www.jamestownri.net
if rain: indoors in Jamestown Recreation Center
ATWATER-DONNELLY DUO
Sun.,July 12, 2009
Barrington Town Hall Lawn
Barrington, RI

6-7 pm
free
(401) 247-1925
if rain, in middle school auditorium
ATWATER-DONNELLY DUO
Sat.,July 25, 2009
Foster Old Home Days
Foster, RI
12-3 pm
$4 admission to the fair
(401) 392-9200/647-5476

ATWATER-DONNELLY DUO
Fri., Aug. 14, 2009
North Kingstown Free Library
Outdoor Family Program
100 Boone St.
North Kingstown, RI
6-7:15 pm
free to the public
www.nklibrary.org
(401) 294-3306
outside, in library if inclement weather
If you would like to be removed from this email list, simpy reply with “remove” in the subject line and please remember to include your email address in the text of the message.   Thanks!

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Music and Poetry at Tazza

Monday, March 30th, 2009

Mark Milloff & Mairéad Byrne present:

Tues 3/31
couscous@tazza
MUSIC
8pm Mark Milloff (blues)9pm Marlie Wanseth + Josie Crosby
POETRY 10-11pm: Nehassaiu deGannes
Michael Gizzi—Christopher Johnson—Daniel PeltzJon Wolston
MUSIC
11pm-closing: Arvid Tomayko Peters and Modest Machine: Pictures of an Exhibitionist
www.tazzacaffe.com

Free

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4th ANNUAL MUSIC for FILM Networking Event:

Monday, March 30th, 2009

If you no longer wish to receive email from RIFC please use the unsubscribe link at the bottom

4th ANNUAL MUSIC for FILM Networking Event:

(Brought to you by New Film Nation/Beanywood)

REGISTRATION: (Pre-register online until Tuesday, April 7th)

5:30-8:30pm: Check in and pick up your nametag and program

*Meet Berklee College of Music composers, sound designers and audio engineers  *Check program for student bios and expo booth locations

PRESENTATIONS: Working Collaboratively – The Compose/Director Relationship

Moderated by Jeanine Cowen, Composer, Music Producer and Game Sound Designer, Assistant Vice President of Academic Affairs, Berklee College of Music
Maureen Foley, Director of American Wake

Alice Bouvrie, Director of Prison Pups

Lorre Fritchy, Director, Writer and Producer of Millies

6:30 – 7:15 pm and 7:45 – 8:30 pm

Music on camera – real or playback?
Dealing with onscreen source music, and involving the composer/music editor/music supervisor earlier in the process

Mason Daring, Emmy, Peabody, and Golden Globe award-winning film and television composer, Visiting Professor, Berklee College of Music
6:30 – 7:15 pm and 7:45 – 8:30 pm

RAFFLE: 7:20-7:40 pm • Prizes TBA

BERKLEE COLLEGE OF MUSIC’S 5TH FILM SCORING CONTEST FINALISTS’ SHOWCASE & AWARDS CEREMONY:
8:30 – 9:00 pm – Media Center
 • Premiere of the finalists’ scores to Michael’s Rose, directed by Burlington College student Heather Beliveau
 • Meet the contest finalists and winners

EVENT LOCATION:
Berklee College of Music
Media Center
150 Massachusetts Avenue
Boston, MA 02215
Media Center – 2nd floor
The event is open to all filmmakers and composers free of charge

Questions? E-mail Chris Fitzgerald at cfitzgerald@berklee.edu 

                                       *******************************************                                            Call for Films: The Online New England Film Festival
Screen Online for 45 days * Audience & Jury Awards * Winners Screen at
Coolidge Corner in Boston * Prizes & more…

The 1st Annual Online New England Film Festival, presented by
NewEnglandFilm.com, will launch as an online showcase of selected
films from September 1, 2009 through October 15, 2009. The Online New
England Film Festival will showcase films under 30 minutes in the
following categories: animation, children/family, comedy, documentary,
and drama. The films will be selected by NewEnglandFilm.com staff and
the festival’s esteemed jury.

In addition, the festival has partnered
with Women in Film Video New England (WIFVNE) who will jury the
special category New England Women Above the Line for films under 30
minute produced, directed, or written by a woman or women based in New
England.
$20 Early Deadline: April 1, 2009
$25 Regular Deadline: May 15, 2009
$30 Late Deadline: June 1, 2009
$50 Extended (Withoutabox only): June 15, 2009
Note: $5 discount for students with a photocopy of a valid ID and
Withoutabox member plans.


Michele Meek
writer ~ publisher ~ entrepreneur
www.michelemeek.com

Publisher, Independent Media Publications, www.independent-magazine.org

Founder/Publisher, NewEnglandFilm.com, www.newenglandfilm.com

Founder, Little Plum Pictures, www.littleplum.tv

 ***************************************************************************

SENT FROM BOSTON CASTING:

You are cordially invited to attend the 7th Annual Boston International Film Festival.  The festival will feature a Red Carpet entrance and an opening and closing night Galas.  It will run from Friday, April 17, 2009 to Sunday, April 26, 2009.  It will take place at the AMC/Loews Theater, located at 175 Tremont Street, Boston Common. 

The festival will feature over 100 short and feature length films, with categories including narrative, animation and documentary.  The festival will include films from 38 countries from 5 continents. 

The festival is the largest in Massachusetts and one of the largest in the United States.  It is recognized by major institutions and corporations in the entertainment industry, as one of the leading film events.  Since its inception, the festival has strived to support independent films, made both internationally and locally.  It has served as a platform, in which to unite the diverse Boston community by highlighting both global diversity, as well as cultural similarities.

There are two opening night films.  The first is “What Would It Look Like?”  A documentary that asks us to reflect
on the state of the world and ourselves, and to listen more closely to what is being asked of us at this time of
unprecedented global transformation.  The second is “What Doesn’t Kill You”, a riveting story, starring Mark Ruffalo, Ethan Hawke, and Amanda Peet.  It was directed by Brian Goodman, a Boston native filmmaker.  The casting was done by Boston Casting. The diversity of these two films is a good example of how the festival supports such a range of approaches to cinema.

If you would like to attend, please visit www.bifilmfestival.com ; for information on how to acquire tickets, email info@bifilmfestival.com, or call 617-482-3900. 

This is not an RIFC Production 

 

If you no longer wish to receive these emails, or you wish to update your profile, please click here.

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Paintings by John Riedel At The Bank RI Galleries

Monday, March 30th, 2009

 

The BankRI Galleries present:

BankRI North Kingstown Gallery: “Paintings by John Riedel”, April 2 through

July 1, 2009. The branch is located at 1140 Ten Rod Road in North Kingstown.

Hours are Monday through Friday 9 a.m. to7 p.m., Saturday 9 a.m. to 3 p.m.

and Sunday noon to 4 p.m. For more information, contact www.bankri.com orcall 456-5015, ext 1330.

 

MEET THE ARTIST – JOHN RIEDEL

It’s not easy gaining access to the studio of Providence painter John

Riedel. It’s not that Riedel isn’t friendly; the shy, soft-spoken painter

is clearly an approachable kind of guy. It’s just that the first floor of

the corner house he shares with painter Ida Schmulowitz in the Fox Point

section of Providence is jammed packed with thirty years worth of paintings,

pastels and watercolors – literally several hundred works of art.

 

A narrow path barely big enough for a cat provides the only access to

Riedel’s studio. Plants, tubes of paint and books vie for air and floor

space. Clearly, there is one abiding passion in this house and that passion

is painting.

 

Born in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, Riedel’s dad worked for the U.S. Army and as a

consequence, the family moved around quite a bit. Riedel lived in seven

different states from the time of his birth until he graduated high school.

His interest in painting came late in his teenage years. One day the

fifteen-year-old Riedel found a box of paints in his mother’s closet. He

set up a still life and started painting. No art classes or inspirational

teacher for Riedel. He did it on his own. With some encouragement from

his mother, he applied to the Rhode Island School of Design and was

accepted. From then on in, Riedel hasn’t left Providence and hasn’t stopped

painting.

 

Riedel’s paintings are bright, vibrant still lifes and landscapes. He is a

throw back to the old-fashioned painter who works from life under natural

light. Yet his works are not realistic; they are instead, a distinct

departure from what he sees. He manipulates space and color to create an

atmosphere every bit as deep and dense as a tropical jungle, yet the

paintings depict familiar scenes of home and garden. It is an endearing

combination of comfortable, recognizable scenes of everyday life jolted with

shots of juiced up color and unusual angles. The paintings manage to excite

and nurture at the same time, and are definitely worth the time it takes to

negotiate the path to his studio.

 

 

The BankRI Galleries are curated by Paula Martiesian, a Providence-based

artist and arts advocate.

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Weekend Update in the Blackstone Valley 3/27/09 – 4/2/09

Monday, March 30th, 2009

Celebrate French Culture

* Saturday, March 28, 7 pm, Franco-Fete, dancing to French tunes, Le Foyer, Pawtucket

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In Our Museums & Galleries

* Thursday, March 26 – Sunday, March 29 – Exhibit: Documents that Highlight Rhode

Island’s Involvement in the Slave Trade at Museum of Work and Culture [http://rs6.net/tn.jsp?et=1102513628082&e=001ctNsLOS0Eu0DRG7bZiJljlfSMmGQyYUgInPiqLDpC8pi-vw9c3_QL4RqYi3sEWyrhkEzKdnqOfnt1z7aGFD3uiaBbozUAuhBQM59JNCW1D0=]

*

Sunday, March 29 Free for All Sunday at Slater Mill [http://rs6.net/tn.jsp?et=1102513628082&e=001ctNsLOS0Eu1m8x74ikCMNG6HI6yhybMBgveN4BJ5OwFUCp5xyDxCIyMRuCR97aYt_lvWfYwniWcLQ287GEeuzqK4cv7mjYoSVPzNAfBodqW1MCQ6ydvodA==]

11:00 am – 3:00 pm

* Sunday, March 29, Opening Reception Four Person Show, Rhode Island Water Color

Society [http://rs6.net/tn.jsp?et=1102513628082&e=001ctNsLOS0Eu3NrSUNtHzIMIfy496x1tjfPOih5MMzmUrp0V24EAjSjl-BpdbW0MqgqhppvQXG9AzUnHh7abAjEqdlxeqCWkBr_-qQHmFASLU=],

1:00 pm – 4:00 pm. Exhibit through April 16.

DestinationAward [http://rs6.net/tn.jsp?et=1102513628082&e=001ctNsLOS0Eu3NrSUNtHzIMIfy496x1tjfPOih5MMzmUrp0V24EAjSjl-BpdbW0MqgqhppvQXG9AzUnHh7abAjEqdlxeqCWkBr_-qQHmFASLU=]

Rhode Island Water Color Society in Pawtucket

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Community Events

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KAB [http://rs6.net/tn.jsp?et=1102513628082&e=001ctNsLOS0Eu3sdms1HIeex97m-mfUNtMebu-T3Y22L2z9P9KMjQjs9fdwFZxsUF1yqDOB_AIGoDndsBhNXRqaTlPQHSJZ7X7onIVydZraBU2vgechMhVRpiFWJNOQOTXaR_hR9OoV1tg=]

River Cleanup

River Cleanup, Sunday, March 29

8:30 am – 12:00 pm

Location: Central Falls Landing, Broad Street & Madeira Avenue, Central Falls

In partnership with the Blackstone River Watershed Council

email: keithhainley@blackstoneriver.org [mailto:keithhainley@blackstoneriver.org] Blackstone Watershed Council [http://rs6.net/tn.jsp?et=1102513628082&e=001ctNsLOS0Eu3g69uV2J7eT7gw-PnWqYWmnHX7EeMmxGYUh9xz8lzi8MkZQyiQ34R61QZEqGDhyLEeWvMJyMcuYLzDMBd1IxD4WAWDmZa4rmTaHUPo1zO_JTR2nujx1PkW]

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Look for Signs of Spring at Audubon Society’s Powder Mill Ledges in North Smithfield

ASRI [http://rs6.net/tn.jsp?et=1102513628082&e=001ctNsLOS0Eu0amzD5l0IG_Z75gzocBxavKu8UgVI_eh8UV94FFcQgF8ymulwQWZ_2lTVFmFXu757G8Ab8vpGPiTBjuh4EUAsDUBj4pG9sNec=]

Visit the Powder Mill Ledges in North Smithfield and take stroll along the trails

looking for the first signs of the season. Visit ASRI.org [http://rs6.net/tn.jsp?et=1102513628082&e=001ctNsLOS0Eu0amzD5l0IG_Z75gzocBxavKu8UgVI_eh8UV94FFcQgF8ymulwQWZ_2lTVFmFXu757G8Ab8vpGPiTBjuh4EUAsDUBj4pG9sNec=]for

more information and Audubon events.

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Saturday, March 28 9:00 am – 1:00 pm

Four Corners Community Chapel, 200 Angell Road, Cumberland, RI

For more information, click here [http://rs6.net/tn.jsp?et=1102513628082&e=001ctNsLOS0Eu37OmfTt_Tlm9uaoIYOERWi__V_KlitobSpSmGYiS3fPEqTVjdn3Tt4GB008H4cgXg1BhXMqfHk-cn41aOvIjtuORXkOyfko209UnyCgf9jSMqzPAexsVZn5AtHWHDVSOxNnw4ynRTFLYVM9s4JefO9]

or contact Emily Soergel at Keep Blackstone Valley Beautiful

401-724-2200.

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Arts & Entertainment

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theatre works [http://rs6.net/tn.jsp?et=1102513628082&e=001ctNsLOS0Eu0s5_OmAQWSeVwg-uE1JsLsekgJ9BIuZCVKt4a4rwMjtAgFROzpvYaTNSpL9bN8NRQ7RA96LGEoxXbCguX4vH7NqtQ5Glc-ENA=]

Theatre Works Presents Tenneesee Williams Classic

 

Friday, March 27th -

Sunday, April 5, 2009

Theatre Works presents Tenneesee Williams classic, The The Glass Menagerie. Click

here [http://rs6.net/tn.jsp?et=1102513628082&e=001ctNsLOS0Eu0s5_OmAQWSeVwg-uE1JsLsekgJ9BIuZCVKt4a4rwMjtAgFROzpvYaTNSpL9bN8NRQ7RA96LGEoxXbCguX4vH7NqtQ5Glc-ENA=]

for performance timesandticket information.

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For Dining Options in the Blackstone Valley Visit

dine blackstone [http://rs6.net/tn.jsp?et=1102513628082&e=001ctNsLOS0Eu1fJhj-2oDiSv3psu2UwrB7bMLl2etV3qk7Rid7mzw-hbGWp-ut1zoukNScSR4GNAyjAX1ztH4lrvT8TXB_tyCXC8Jqsuy5-0--fx3j4sB_AnY7SE6DAAWp]

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RockinforHunger [http://rs6.net/tn.jsp?et=1102513628082&e=001ctNsLOS0Eu2VCNRwNIQwQrb3wkXyJM72CURxnas_ynSt2_qB8EYOj4-BHPQW_wgWf0HA6pZcxgJGzCpBjF7AXvYZZMQBItLUAnY55rs8mtHGw5-sb9EaaM4BKUO2oxqwWXSu4zbCDHNrsyNJ8xp1HQPNCxD3n3IJsiQOIKMSLDY=]

Saturday, March 28, 2009

6:30 pm

A concert event for those in need at the Twin River Event Center. Click here [http://rs6.net/tn.jsp?et=1102513628082&e=001ctNsLOS0Eu2VCNRwNIQwQrb3wkXyJM72CURxnas_ynSt2_qB8EYOj4-BHPQW_wgWf0HA6pZcxgJGzCpBjF7AXvYZZMQBItLUAnY55rs8mtHGw5-sb9EaaM4BKUO2oxqwWXSu4zbCDHNrsyNJ8xp1HQPNCxD3n3IJsiQOIKMSLDY=]

for more information. To purchase tickets please go to www.rockinforhunger.com [http://rs6.net/tn.jsp?et=1102513628082&e=001ctNsLOS0Eu1NhNK3xBqPb2zrLiIKH81gSkKJZEKH9I8TiCHWZfHGpuTEj46nVB7c21MFk9TxlLfxnnW5N7HHMX_fmLTpmECFN0qW52O9NtKD4a-zzvoFL2QYf5H_me_r].

Tickets are $15.

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Event Listings

Visit our event calendar for more listings eventblackstone.com [http://rs6.net/tn.jsp?et=1102513628082&e=001ctNsLOS0Eu1SpVTWJ01CNT3lSUwkybbWhKJ6IouYYUnufQrd5Zovyvi1NW0BwYdH1YXsYq6ycZfFHmQAaRaIXacdF8ltk2QdKzfUy9IvfmmtoRmy7_w3I8ZnmR8GnYtf]

If you want your event listed submit online at eventblackstone.com or

email patti@tourblackstone.com [mailto:patti@tourblackstone.com] ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Support Blackstone Valley Tourism Council Programs

good search [http://rs6.net/tn.jsp?et=1102513628082&e=001ctNsLOS0Eu3CqE_0eavjmryUu7VKm0CVMeYE7TP2ajeThFnratDNbcQskoD9fa_dnJzqpRjPsHvBN7EfPeZjH6ZAcsSGQyouR1_0OcfGaXIs4NfUWtIrp4ac5tphDg2yP5eL6lOHTNY=]

Use Good Search for your Search Engine and support the Blackstone Valley Tourism

Council.

Blackstone Valley Tourism Council | 175 Main Street | Pawtucket | RI | 02860

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Rhode Island Arts Grade Span Expectations

Friday, March 27th, 2009

 

The development of the Rhode Island Department of Education (RIDE) Arts Grade Span Expectations (GSE) began as a call from arts educators, both certified and teaching artists, from community arts organizations, from school administrators, from higher education professors, from parents and from students. These calls were heard by arts and education leaders statewide.   As a result, the Governor’s Task Force on Literacy in the Arts was created by Executive Order.   The members of that Task Force, along with teams of other community members, used the findings of the Task Force to establish the Arts Learning Network – a formal network represented by each of the groups previously mentioned – and the hard work began.

 

On January 9, 2003, RIDE announced that a new set of regulations regarding high school graduation had been adopted by the RI Board of Regents. This announcement was made at the first RI Arts Learning Network (RIALN) meeting. The charge given to this new learning community was to develop a set of expectations describing what a student who is proficient in an art form would know and be able to do.

 

During the years since, four professional communities focused on the art forms of Music, Visual Arts & Design, Dance and Theatre worked together to build these draft GSEs. These teams met regularly with student work in tow–to debate, defend, and come to agreement. Children were always at the center of the conversation and the work. What can young people really do? How do we know? What about students who are underserved? What about children with disabilities? How can this work inform instruction and learning?

 

Under the leadership, vision, and constant advocacy of Commissioner Peter McWalters, these standards are becoming a reality. Our next steps are to vet these Arts GSEs in schools and other arts learning communities across the state and to secure Board of Regents adoption.

 

The goal for this work is to establish local guidelines for providing access and opportunity for all students to graduate with proficiency.

 

This draft is being sent out statewide for public comment. Please forward comments to Rosemary Burns: rosemary.burns@ride.ri.gov  by April 24, 2008.

 

Dance Enduring Understanding 1

Artistic Processes – In dance, problem solving uses the human body and techniques of movement and expression to make the imagined tangible.

Elementary Assessment Target
With others, students solve movement problems and select and combine movement and choreographic principles and structures to create a movement sequence intended to communicate specific ideas, thoughts, or feelings.
Middle Level Assessment Target
Individually or with others, students solve movement problems and organize choreographic principles, structures, and processes to create a movement sequence for intended meaning.
High School Assessment Target
Individually and with others, students solve movement problems and apply choreographic principles, structures, and processes to create movement sequences for various intended purposes, audiences, and meaning.
GSEs for Grades K-2
GSEs for Grades 3-4
GSEs for Grades 5-6
GSEs for Grades 7-8
GSEs for Gr 9-12
HS Extensions
D1 (K-2)-1
Students use knowledge of movement to problem solve by…
D1 (3-4)-1
Students use knowledge of movement to problem solve by…
D1 (5-6)-1
Students use knowledge of movement to problem solve by…
D1 (7-8)-1
Students use knowledge of movement to problem solve by…
D1 (9-12) –1
Students use knowledge of movement to problem solve by…
D1 (9-12) Ext –1
Students use knowledge of movement to problem solve by…
a. demonstrating axial and locomotor movements, varying the use of space, time, and energy  for different purposes a. combining axial and locomotor movements, varying the use of space, time, and energy in response to a prompt  a. combining and applying pre-selected movement elements and skills in response to a prompt  a. applying multiple movement elements and skills in response to a prompt  a. applying multiple movement elements and skills and choreographic principles in response to a prompt a. designing a movement  solution to a self-initiated problem, applying movement elements, skills, and choreographic principles
b. improvising in response to a variety of stimuli
b. improvising in response to a variety of sensory and conceptual stimuli b. improvising in response to literal and abstract ideas/stimuli b. improvising and developing movement sequences b.  improvising and developing movement  sequences
b.  improvising, developing, and refining movement  sequences
D 1 (K-2) – 2
Students express ideas, emotions, or cultural aesthetics by…
D 1 (3-4) – 2
Students express ideas, emotions, or cultural aesthetics by…
D 1 (5-6) – 2
Students express ideas, emotions, or cultural aesthetics by…
D 1 (7-8) – 2
Students express ideas, emotions, or cultural aesthetics by…
D 1 (9-12) – 2
Students express ideas, emotions, or cultural aesthetics by…
D1 (9-12) Ext –2
Students express ideas, emotions, or cultural aesthetics by…
a. exploring and combining  selected movement and choreographic principles (e.g., body parts and shapes, levels, directions, pathways) and applying the structure of beginning, middle, and end a. selecting and combining movement  and choreographic principles (e.g., body parts and shapes, levels, directions, pathways) and applying the structure of beginning, middle, and end a. generating small dance compositions through manipulating choreographic principles (e.g., body use, space, and relationship), simple choreographic structures (e.g., beginning, middle, and end; AB or ABA), and choreographic processes (repetition, variety)
a. generating a structured dance composition through manipulating choreographic principles (e.g., body use, space, and relationship),
simple choreographic structures (e.g., beginning, middle, and end; AB or ABA; rondo; canon; call and response) and choreographic processes (repetition, variety, and transition)
a. generating their own choreography that includes, as appropriate, some of the following: unison, contrast, varied facings, varied groupings, level changes, symmetry and asymmetry, choreographic structures (i.e., beginning, middle, and end; AB or ABA; rondo, canon; call and response), and transitions a. generating their own choreography that includes, as appropriate to the dance work and personal or cultural style some of the following: unison, contrast, varied facings, varied groupings, level changes, symmetry and asymmetry, choreographic structures (i.e., beginning, middle, and end; AB or ABA; rondo, canon; call and response), and transitions.
b. exploring and discovering dance movement to express and communicate ideas, experiences, or feelings b. improvising , exploring, and selecting dance movement to communicate ideas, experiences, and feelings b. improvising , exploring, and selecting dance movement to communicate literal or abstract ideas b. improvising , exploring, and selecting dance movement to communicate literal and abstract ideas b. incorporating  movement choices to communicate ideas, experiences, feelings, or images
b. incorporating  movement choices to communicate ideas, experiences, feelings, or images
c. exploring basic rhythmic patterns, tempos, and movement qualities c. combining simple rhythmic patterns and identifying movement qualities c. designing rhythmic patterns and  selecting movement qualities c. selecting appropriate movement qualities and expressing musical phrasing and rhythms c. designing choreography with an identifiable quality, style, or musicality
c. designing choreography with inherent quality, style, and musicality

 

 

 

Dance Enduring Understanding  2

Cultural Contexts – Purpose and motivation (intent) are fundamental to dance and can be expressed through traditional, non-traditional, western, and non-western forms and styles.

Elementary Assessment Target
Students perform simple dances and explain, describe, and demonstrate movements from a range of forms and styles of dance.
Middle Level Assessment Target
Students perform, interpret, and compare a range of forms and styles of dance.
High School Assessment Target
Students analyze and perform a range of forms and styles of dance (e.g., performing a minimum of two different dance forms or styles with moderate stylistic fluency).
GSEs for Grades K-2
GSEs for Grades 3-4
GSEs for Grades 5-6
GSEs for Grades 7-8
GSEs for Gr 9-12
HS Extensions
­D2 (K-2)-1
Students view, interpret, and perform a range of forms and styles of dance by…
D2 (3-4)-1
Students view, interpret, and perform a range of forms and styles of dance by…
D2 (5-6)-1
Students view, interpret, and perform a range of forms and styles of dance by…
D2 (7-8)-1
Students view, interpret, and perform a range of forms and styles of dance by…
D 2 (9-12) –1
Students view, interpret, and perform a range of forms and styles of dance by…
D 2 (9-12) Ext–1
Students view, interpret, and perform a range of forms and styles of dance by…
a. identifying  the reasons why people in various cultures dance a. explaining the reasons why people in various cultures dance a. explaining the role of dance in various world cultures a. comparing origins and purposes of world or historical dances a.  analyzing the purpose and motivation of the dance in the specific culture or style
a. performing a dance so that the purpose of the dance in the specific culture or style is clear
b. identifying and imitating movements that represent various world cultures b. describing  and demonstrating characteristic movements from various world cultures b. observing/viewing and responding to dances from a variety of world cultures and historical contexts b. comparing dance from different cultures or historical periods b.  analyzing how dances from different cultures or historical periods reflect the values and beliefs of that context b. analyzing how dances from different cultures or historical periods reflect the values and beliefs of that context
c. exploring and performing movement sequences from different dance forms or styles c. performing simple dances of different dance forms or styles c. practicing and performing dances of different forms or styles c. practicing, refining, and performing dances of different forms or styles c. practicing, refining, and performing dances of different forms or styles with moderate stylistic fluency c. practicing, refining, and performing different dance forms or styles with a high level of stylistic fluency

 

 

 

Dance Enduring Understanding 3

Communication – Personal expression and meaning is achieved through the movement of the human body, communicating ideas, values, and emotions.

Elementary Assessment Targets
Students demonstrate kinesthetic awareness, movement skills, rhythmic acuity, and a qualitative range when replicating dance phrases and dances.
Middle Level Assessment Targets
Students demonstrate concentration, kinesthetic awareness, movement skills, rhythmic acuity, and use a qualitative range and phrasing when dancing.
High School Assessment Targets
Students perform dances demonstrating concentration, kinesthetic awareness, rhythmic acuity, qualitative range, and artistic expression.
GSEs for Gr K-2
GSEs for Gr 3-4
GSEs for Gr 5-6
GSEs for Gr 7-8 GSEs for Gr 9-12
HS Extensions
D 3 (K-2) –1
Students demonstrate kinesthetic awareness and movement skills by…
D3 (3-4) –1
Students demonstrate kinesthetic awareness and movement skills by…
D 3 (5-6) –1
Students demonstrate kinesthetic awareness and movement skills by…
D 3 (7-8) –1
Students demonstrate kinesthetic awareness and movement skills by…
D 3 (9-12) –1
Students demonstrate kinesthetic awareness and movement skills by…
D 3 (9-12) Ext–1
Students demonstrate kinesthetic awareness and movement skills by…
a. exhibiting understanding of shapes, personal space, spatial relationships with other dancers, directions (forward, backward, sideways, diagonal, and turning), pathways (straight, curved, circular, diagonal, zigzag and combinations), levels (low, middle, high), and basic locomotor movements a. demonstrating concentration while exhibiting awareness of relationships and spatial directions and pathways a. demonstrating  concentration while exhibiting awareness of relationships and space, and describing how the body executes a movement a. demonstrating  concentration while exhibiting an awareness of relationships and space, and describing how  a  performed movement feels a.  demonstrating concentration while performing with awareness of the body, relationships, and space
a. performing with consistent use of
awareness of the body, relationships and space
b. demonstrating  the following: balance on one or two legs, strength in major muscles, range of motion in joints, and sequential and simultaneous coordination while
performing basic locomotor and non- locomotor movement
b. demonstrating agility, and coordination while: performing simple movement patterns;
starting, changing, and stopping movement; and performing a variety of movements (e.g., whole body/isolations)
b. demonstrating physical control and accurate memorization of movement in the execution of dance  phrases
b. demonstrating physical control and accurate memorization of movement in the execution of different dance forms or styles
 
b.  demonstrating strength, flexibility, agility, and coordination as appropriate to the form or style
                               
b.  demonstrating consistency in performing technical skills that require a great deal of strength, flexibility , agility and coordination as appropriate to the form or style
                                           
D 3 (K-2) –2
Students demonstrate rhythmic acuity by…
D3 (3-4) –2
Students demonstrate rhythmic acuity by…
D 3 (5-6) –2
Students demonstrate rhythmic acuity by…
D 3 (7-8) –2
Students demonstrate rhythmic acuity by…
D 3 (9-12) – 2
Students demonstrate rhythmic acuity by…
D 3 (9-12) Ext- 2
Students demonstrate rhythmic acuity by…
a. dancing in different tempos in response to changes in music or accompaniment a. dancing in relation to and in coordination with changes in rhythm and meter and repeating a rhythmic pattern of movement a. dancing in relation to and in coordination with various tempos,  time signatures, and accented beats a. dancing in relation  to and in coordination with changes in rhythm and meter in even and syncopated rhythms a. performing rhythmic patterns and phrasing and maintaining tempo (when applicable)
a. embedding the complexity of the rhythms throughout the whole body, as required by the dance
D 3 (K-2) –3
Students demonstrate qualitative range and phrasing by…
D 3 (3-4) –3
Students demonstrate qualitative range and phrasing by…
D3 (5-6) –3
Students demonstrate qualitative range and phrasing by…
D 3 (7-8) –3
Students demonstrate qualitative range and phrasing by…
D 3 (9-12) – 3
Students demonstrate qualitative range and phrasing by…
D 3 (9-12) Ext– 3
Students demonstrate qualitative range and phrasing by…
a. initiating a variety of locomotor and non- locomotor movements when given different stimuli a. demonstrating a range of space, time,  weight, and flow (force/energy) concepts (e.g., through dancing opposites:  strong/weak,  rise/sink) a. identifying and  incorporating a variety of space, time, weight , and flow (force/energy) qualities in locomotor and non -locomotor movement a. demonstrating ability and skill in applying space, time, weight, and flow ( force/energy) in reproducing movement  phrases a. presenting movement with clarity of intention of the body in space, time, weight and flow (force/energy) a. presenting movement with a clear and strong intention of the body in space, time, weight and flow
b. replicating combinations of  movements b. replicating dance phrases (e.g., sentences)
b. organizing dance phrases (sentences) that make sense for the concept or idea b. demonstrating artistic expression and understanding of dance phrasing (e.g., climax, ebb and flow, breath rhythms) b. using artistic expression and understanding of phrasing to organize performance b. performing with artistic expression and a heightened sense of personal phrasing, clearly presenting high and low points
c. performing movement phrases or short dances with classmates c. demonstrating focus while dancing c.  demonstrating sustained focus while dancing c. demonstrating focus on the execution of the movement and communication of the concept c. demonstrating commitment to the movement and concept c. demonstrating full commitment to the movement and concept

 

 

 

Dance Enduring Understanding  4

Aesthetic Judgment- Knowledge of dance as an art form is used to reflect on and evaluate the work of self and others.

Elementary Assessment Target
Students identify and discuss differences and similarities between or among dances.
Students explain what a dance communicates and reflect on, evaluate, and revise performed movement of self or others.
Middle Level Assessment Target
Students identify and compare how movement and choreographic choices are used to communicate for an intended purpose.
Students describe, analyze, evaluate, and revise choreography or performance of self and others.
High School Assessment Target
Students interpret, analyze, and evaluate choreography and performance of others.
Students reflect on, evaluate, and revise choreography or performance of self.
GSEs for Grades K-2
GSEs for Grades 3-4
GSEs for Grades 5-6
GSEs for Grades 7-8
GSEs for Gr 9-12
HS Extensions
D 4 (K-2) –1
Students demonstrate understanding of dance forms and styles, techniques and elements, and choreographic processes and principles by…
D4 (3-4) –1
Students demonstrate understanding of dance forms and styles, techniques and elements, and choreographic processes and principles by…
D4 (5-6) –1
Students demonstrate understanding of dance forms and styles, techniques and elements, and choreographic processes and principles by…
D 4 (7-8) –1
Students demonstrate understanding of dance forms and styles, techniques and elements, and choreographic processes and principles by…
D 4 (9-12) –1
Students demonstrate understanding of dance forms and styles, techniques and elements, and choreographic processes and principles by…
D 4 (9-12) Ext–1
Students demonstrate understanding of dance forms and styles, techniques and elements, and choreographic processes and principles by…
a. identifying and describing basic elements that distinguish one dance from another (e.g., speed, clothing, music, setting) a. identifying, describing and comparing elements between and among dances a. comparing the movement and  choreographic choices  of different dance compositions or dances a. comparing how the movements and choreographic choices support or don’t support the main idea, theme, or feeing of the dance a.  analyzing how movements and structure support the main ideas, theme, or feeling of the dance
a. providing insightful comments about the nature of a particular dance and its meaning and selecting specific moments within the performance that support these assertions
D4 (K-2) -2
Students analyze construction and achievement of effect or affect by…
D4 (3-4) -2
Students analyze construction and achievement of effect or affect by…
D 4 (5-6) -2
Students analyze construction and achievement of effect or affect by…
D 4 (7-8) -2
Students analyze construction and achievement of effect or affect by…
D4 (9-12) -2
Students analyze construction and achievement of effect or affect by…
D4 (9-12) Ext- 2
Students analyze construction and achievement of effect or affect by…
a. discussing performed movement with others and refining that movement   a. evaluating and revising performed movement to fulfill its purpose a. evaluating and revising performed  movement and choreography  to fulfill its purpose a. evaluating and revising performed  movement and choreography  to fulfill its purpose a. evaluating, editing, and revising choreography or performance a. evaluating, editing, and revising choreography and performance
b. experiencing what a dance communicates or expresses b. explaining what a dance communicates or expresses b. observing or performing a dance and analyzing its construction b. observing or performing a dance, analyzing its construction, and evaluating its effectiveness b. critically analyzing, interpreting, and evaluating observed or performed dance (using dance terminology) b. critically analyzing, interpreting, and evaluating observed or performed dance (using dance terminology)

 

 

Music Enduring Understanding 1
Artistic Processes – The human experience can be created and recreated through sound.
Elementary Assessment Targets
Students chant rhythmic patterns using rhythmic mnemonics (e.g., word chants, rhythm syllables of ta ti-ti or du du-de).
 

Students echo sing/chant short rhythmic or melodic pentatonic patterns and play short rhythmic or melodic pentatonic patterns on pitched barred instruments.

Middle Level Assessment Targets
Students demonstrate their ability to sight read music by singing or playing a short, unfamiliar piece of music.
Students create a melodic variation of a familiar melody being performed in class (e.g., compose short variations to an 8-bar melody).
Using music software/technology (e.g., Band-in-a-Box, Garage Band, Mixcraft, etc.) students create an original arrangement by combining instruments, or changing tempo or style.
High School Assessment Targets
Ensemble students listen and dictate melodies with accurate notation of rhythm and pitch.
 
Students identify melody, harmony, accompaniment, bass line, and counter melody.
 

Students improvise original musical ideas (e.g., scat sing, play instruments) on a 12-bar blues form.

GSEs for Grades K-2
GSEs for Grades 3-4
GSEs for Grades 5-6
GSEs for Grades 7-8
GSEs for Gr 9-12
HS Extensions
M1 (K-2)-1
Students show evidence of music literacy (reading, writing, and understanding of the symbols of sound) by…    
M1 (3-4)-1
Students show evidence of music literacy (reading, writing, and understanding of the symbols of sound) by…    
M1 (5-6)-1
Students show evidence of music literacy (reading, writing, and understanding of the symbols of sound) by…    
M1 (7-8)-1
Students show evidence of music literacy (reading, writing, and understanding of the symbols of sound) by…    
M1 (9-12) –1
Students show evidence of music literacy (reading, writing, and understanding of the symbols of sound) by…    
M1 (9-12) Ext – 1 Students show evidence of music literacy (reading, writing, and understanding of the symbols of sound) by…
a. reading, writing, and performing simple rhythmic patterns using iconic or standard notation, including: quarter note/rest, eighth notes (paired), sixteenth-notes, (i.e., four sounds on a beat), half note/rest  a. reading, writing, and performing  rhythmic patterns using standard notation, including: whole note/rest, sixteenth-note patterns, eighth-quarter-eighth syncopation, dotted quarter-eighth/eighth-dotted quarter, and dotted half note a. reading, writing, and performing rhythmic patterns using standard notation, including: dotted eighth-sixteenth/sixteenth-dotted eighth, three barred-eighths, quarter-eighth & eighth-quarter in 6/8, and eight-note triplets
a. reading, writing, and performing rhythmic patterns using standard notation, including: augmentation and diminution a. reading an instrumental or vocal score of up to four staves a. reading a full band, orchestral, or choral score, identifying melody, harmony, accompaniment, bass line, and counter melody
b. reading, writing, and performing simple patterns in meters of 2 and 3 b. reading, writing, and performing simple patterns in meters of 2/4, 3/4, 4/4, and 6/8  b. reading, writing, and performing patterns in a variety of meters, including: meter in 5, meter in 7, and mixed meter b. reading, writing, and performing patterns in a variety of meters, including: 3/8, 2/2, changing meters
b. transcribing simple songs when presented aurally into melodic and rhythmic notation
c. reading, writing, and performing simple patterns of pitch using solfege (e.g., so-mi, la-so-mi, mi-re-do, la-so-mi-re-do) c. reading, writing, and performing patterns of pitch (e.g., la-so-mi-re-do-la,-so, do-la-so-fa-mi-re-do, ti) and known songs using solfege (e.g., Sourwood Mountain, Chairs to Mend, Cancion de cuna) and absolute pitch letter names (e.g., recorder B, A, G, E, and D, barred instruments using treble clef patterns) c. reading, writing, and performing patterns of pitch (pentatonic and diatonic major and minor patterns) and known songs using solfege (e.g., Dona nobis pacem, The Water is Wide) and absolute pitch letter names (e.g., recorder low C to high C, barred instruments using treble clef patterns) c. reading, writing, and performing patterns of pitch (pentatonic and diatonic major, minor, and modes) and known songs using solfege (e.g., Deep in the Heart of Texas, Yonder Come Day) and absolute pitch letter names (e.g., recorder, barred instruments, guitar) c. accurately and expressively sight-reading music with minimal rhythmic, pitch, and dynamic errors at a grade span below full ensemble/class performance level (e.g., music that might be performed by middle school band/ensemble)
c. accurately and expressively sight-reading music at full ensemble/class performance level
 

 

M1 (K-2) – 2
Students show evidence of improvising, composing, and arranging by…
M1 (3-4) – 2
Students show evidence of improvising, composing, and arranging by…
M1 (5-6) – 2
Students show evidence of improvising, composing, and arranging by…
M1 (7-8) – 2
Students show evidence of improvising, composing, and arranging by…
M1 (9-12) – 2
Students show evidence of improvising, composing, and arranging by…
M1 (9-12) Ext – 2 Students show evidence of improvising, composing, and arranging by…
a. improvising songs to accompany play activities
 
 
a. improvising answers in the same style to given melodic or rhythmic patterns a. improvising simple rhythmic variations and melodic embellishments on familiar melodies
a. improvising simple harmonic accompaniments
a. improvising rhythmic and melodic variations on given pentatonic melodies in major or minor keys, or improvise stylistically appropriate harmonizing parts (e.g., guitar or keyboard accompaniments)
a. improvising over- chord progressions in and out of diatonic keys using guide tones, scale approaches, and chord-key relationships in an appropriate style
b. improvising rhythmic patterns to accompany songs b. composing or arranging music to accompany readings or dramatizations (e.g., music for a “haunted house”, music for a reading of The Little Engine that Could) c. composing melodic variations or short original melodies based on specified parameters (e.g., specifying the starting/ending note on do, staying within pitches of Do-Sol, specifying rhythms) b. composing original melodies with expanded parameters (e.g., full major/minor scale, expanded rhythms)
 
b. composing original melodies using accepted compositional devices (e.g. melodic variation, diminution, augmentation) or creating accompaniment for original or existing melodies (e.g., harmonizing using diatonic chords, use of triadic harmony)
b. composing original melodies in extended forms (e.g., complete song forms, theme and variations, sonata form) with accompaniments
c. arranging existing music for another ensemble (e.g., SSA choral music written for Woodwind trio) or by changing style, tempo, or instrumentation (e.g., changing elements of music using software) c. arranging music by manipulating musical elements (e.g., manually or using music software)
c. arranging music by manipulating specified elements (e.g., changing instruments, voices, time signatures, creating original introductions, codas)

Music Enduring Understanding 2
Cultural Contexts – Music connects and expresses history and culture around the globe.
Elementary Assessment Targets
Students recognize and describe music and celebrations of different cultures (e.g., cultures represented in the school population, everyday life, cultures studied).
 

Students work together to present a class or school play integrating dance, music, and art to tell a story or commemorate an event.

Middle Level Assessment Targets
Students describe cultural influences, style, genre, historical time period, and characteristic instrumentation of selected representative musical selections.
 

Students explain the connections between musical concepts and other disciplines (e.g., classical balance of form to symmetry in architecture in buildings).

High School Assessment Targets
Students compare and contrast cultural influences, historical time period, style, and genre of selected (unfamiliar) musical selections.
 

Students research and present an oral or written report tracing the development of a given music genre (e.g., guitar class researches and reports on the blues, orchestra members research and discusses the concerto).

GSEs for Grades K-2
GSEs for Grades 3-4
GSEs for Grades 5-6
GSEs for Grades 7-8
GSEs for Gr 9-12
HS Extensions
­­M2 (K-2)-1
Students show evidence of cultural and historical understanding of (familiar and unfamiliar) music by…
M2 (3-4)-1
Students show evidence of cultural and historical understanding of (familiar and unfamiliar) music by…
M2 (5-6)-1
Students show evidence of cultural and historical understanding of (familiar and unfamiliar) music by…
M2 (7-8)-1
Students show evidence of cultural and historical understanding of (familiar and unfamiliar) music by…
M2 (9-12) –1
Students show evidence of cultural and historical understanding of (familiar and unfamiliar) music by…
M2 (9-12) Ext –1
Students show evidence of cultural and historical understanding of (familiar and unfamiliar) music by…
a. using personal vocabulary to describe voices and instruments from diverse cultures a. using the terminology of music in discussing individual preferences for specific music from diverse cultures.  a. identifying instruments from a variety of cultures both visually and aurally a. listening to and describing the distinguishing characteristics of representative musical genres and styles from two or more cultures
 
a. classifying, by genre or style and historical period or culture, unfamiliar but representative aural examples of music and explain the reasoning for the classification a. classifying and identifying uses of music elements in nontraditional art music (e.g., atonal, twelve-tone, serial).
b. recognizing and discussing music representing various cultures (e.g., represented in the school population) b. identifying the use of music in various cultures and time periods through discussion about the cultures represented in the school population and beyond b. describing the social, religious, and celebratory functions of a variety of musical forms from various cultures and time periods (e.g., folk songs, dances) b. explaining how music has historically reflected social functions and changing ideas and values b. identifying the sources of various musical genres, tracing the evolution of those genres, and citing well-known musicians associated with them b. comparing and contrasting the social function of a variety of music forms in various cultures and time periods
­­M2 (K-2)-2
Students show evidence of connecting music to the arts and other disciplines by . . .
­­M2 (3-4)-2
Students show evidence of connecting music to the arts and other disciplines by . . .
­­M2 (5-6)-2
Students show evidence of connecting music to the arts and other disciplines by . . .
­­M2 (7-8)-2
Students show evidence of connecting music to the arts and other disciplines by . . .
­­M2 (9-12)-2
Students show evidence of connecting music to the arts and other disciplines by . . .
­­M2 (9-12) Ext -2
Students show evidence of connecting music to the arts and other disciplines by . . .
a. identifying ways other disciplines are inter-related with music using personal vocabulary, movement, or singing/playing (e.g., lullabies, marches, time patterns relevant to math) a. integrating several arts disciplines (dance, music, theatre, or the visual arts) to communicate meaning or thematic content. a. finding the connections between musical content and other disciplines (e.g., meter/note value to math, lyric content to ELA, cultural music to geographical origins) a. identifying similarities and differences in the meanings of common terms used in various arts and other subject areas a. explaining how elements, artistic processes, and organizational principles are used in similar and distinctive ways in the various arts a. explaining ways in which the principles and subject matter of music and various disciplines outside the arts are interrelated
b. creating a music score using technology that appropriately enhances or contrasts works of selected visual art (e.g., MasterTrax, Finale, iMovie, PowerPoint).


Music Enduring Understanding 3

Communication – Music of diverse genres is performed in a variety of settings.

Elementary Assessment Targets
Students sing and play (together and alone) a variety of styles and genres of music in a variety of settings.
Students accompany their singing using body percussion accompaniment.
Middle Level Assessment Targets
Students perform familiar songs solo, demonstrating tone, time, technique, and expression.
 

Students play or sing music from various genres and diverse cultures within a large ensemble setting.
 

High School Assessment Targets
Students perform familiar and unfamiliar songs solo, demonstrating tone, time, technique, and expression.
Students perform diverse genres of music and chamber literature solo.
 

Students perform music from various genre and diverse cultures within a large ensemble setting.

GSEs for Grades K-2
GSEs for Grades 3-4
GSEs for Grades 5-6
GSEs for Grades 7-8
GSEs for Gr 9-12
HS Extensions
M3 (K-2) –1
Students perform music alone and with others in a variety of settings…
M3 (3-4) –1
Students perform music alone and with others in a variety of settings…
M3 (5-6) –1
Students perform music alone and with others in a variety of settings…
M3 (7-8) –1
Students perform music alone and with others in a variety of settings…
M3 (9-12) –1
Students perform music alone and with others in a variety of settings…
M3 (9-12) Ext –1
Students perform music alone and with others in a variety of settings…
a. singing a varied repertoire of music from diverse cultures, including unison songs and patterns with musical accuracy a. singing a varied repertoire of music from diverse cultures, including rounds, ostinatos, and descants with musical accuracy a. singing a varied repertoire including 2- and 3-part arrangements with musical accuracy
 
a. singing a varied repertoire including up to 3 parts using treble and bass clefs with musical accuracy
 
a. singing a varied repertoire in a variety of focused ensemble settings with musical accuracy (e.g., SSA, SATB, musical theatre) a. singing in upper level ensembles demonstrating independence (e.g., soloist, chamber group, jazz ensemble, all-state/ honors group)
b. playing songs, classroom instruments, and body percussion (e.g., drums, shakers, rhythm, sticks, barred instruments) b. playing classroom instruments, pitched and unpitched, with musical accuracy (e.g., recorders, castanets) b. playing musical instruments with musical accuracy (e.g., guitar, keyboard, wind and string instruments)
 
[Level of Difficulty:  1 on a scale of 1-6 (ensembles) or commensurate easy difficulty level for other classes (e.g., guitar and  keyboard) ]
b. playing a varied repertoire representing various genres, styles, cultures using acoustic or electronic musical instruments with musical accuracy.
 
[Ensembles at Level of Difficulty:   2-3 on a scale of 1-6 or commensurate medium-easy difficulty level for other classes (e.g., keyboard, drum circles, technology classes)]
b. playing acoustic or electronic instruments in ensembles or music technology settings with musical accuracy
 
[Ensembles at Level of Difficulty:  4 on a scale of 1-6 or commensurate medium difficulty level for other classes (e.g., keyboard, drum circles, guitar, technology classes)]
b. playing in an upper level ensemble demonstrating independence (e.g., soloist, chamber group, all-state/ honors group).
 
[Ensembles at Level of Difficulty:  5-6 on a scale of 1-6 or commensurate medium-hard difficulty level for other classes (e.g., keyboard, drum circles, guitar, technology classes)]
b. presenting a composition using a virtual instrument and digital audio software


Music Enduring Understanding  4

Aesthetic Judgment- Music knowledge is applied through reflection and evaluation of the music of self and others.

Elementary Assessment Targets
Students describe the use of musical elements, musical form, and instrumentation using supporting illustrations, charts, or visuals. (Responses incorporate appropriate musical terminology by grade 4.)
Middle Level Assessment Targets
Students analyze a variety of genres and cultures of music emphasizing expanded forms, instrumentation, and tonality. 
High School Assessment Targets
Students analyze a variety of genres of music focusing on the techniques and applications. 
GSEs for Grades K-2
GSEs for Grades 3-4
GSEs for Grades 5-6
GSEs for Grades 7-8
GSEs for Gr 9-12
HS Extensions
M 4 (K-2) –1
Students analyze and describe music by…
M 4 (3-4) –1
Students analyze and describe music by…
M 4 (5-6) –1
Students analyze and describe music by…
M 4 (7-8) –1
Students analyze and describe music by…
M 4 (9-12) –1
Students analyze and describe music by…
M 4 (9-12) Ext –1
Students analyze and describe music by…
a. identifying and describing basic musical elements of pitch and rhythm in selected pieces of music (e.g., high/low, fast/slow, loud/soft, ascending/descending melody, even/uneven rhythm patterns) a. describing music and identifying melody, rhythm, harmony, and timbre using appropriate music terminology a. identifying, analyzing, and comparing the musical elements in aural examples from various genres and cultures emphasizing meter and rhythm a. analyzing and comparing the use of musical elements of different genres and cultures emphasizing tonality and texture (e.g., intervals, chords and progressions, homophonic) a. analyzing and describing the use of musical elements and expressive devices in familiar music (e.g., articulation, dynamic markings) a. analyzing and describing, musical elements in familiar and unfamiliar music
b. identifying simple musical forms (e.g., phrase/echo/ verse/refrain, AB, ABA) b. identifying simple musical forms (e.g., AABA, AABB, rondo) b. identifying and describing musical forms (e.g., theme and variations, 12-bar blues) b. identifying and describing larger music forms (e.g., canon, fugue, suite, ballet, opera, symphony) b. analyzing and identifying the use of form in a varied repertoire of familiar music
 
b. comparing and contrasting the use of form, both past and present, in a varied repertoire of unfamiliar music 
c. identifying individual timbres of instruments and voices in a variety of music (e.g., winds, brass, bass, soprano, strings) c. identifying and classifying timbres using specified categories (e.g., instruments of the orchestra, jazz combos, world instruments of idiophones, aerophones, chordaphones, membranaphones) c. identifying timbres and matching the cultural context to the group/ensemble (e.g., Indonesian Gamelan, Latin salsa band, Mariachi band)
 
M4 (K-2)- 2
Students evaluate music by…
M4 (3-4)- 2
Students evaluate music by…
M4 (5-6) -2
Students evaluate music by…
M 4 (7-8) -2
Students evaluate music by…
M 4 (9-12) -2
Students evaluate music by…
M 4 (9-12) Ext –2
Students evaluate music by…
a. using age-appropriate music vocabulary to critique music (e.g., “I can hear a steady beat.” “I can hear how the music gets louder.”  “The xylophones and drums played together.”) a. using age-appropriate music vocabulary to critique music (e.g., “The tempo is allegro in the A section.”  “I hear a crescendo before the cymbal crash.”)
 
 
a. developing and applying two specific criteria provided for critiquing music (e.g., dynamic contrast and balance:  “It’s a good performance because they played with crescendos and diminuendos.”)
 
a. developing and applying three specific criteria provided for critiquing music (e.g., dynamics, diction, and articulation: “They played pizzicato at a piano level.”  I understood the meaning of the music, because the choir’s diction was correct.”) a. developing and applying four specific criteria provided for critiquing music (e.g., dynamics, intonation, tone, and blend:  “The clarinets were in-tune with the strings and played with an open-focused sound.”) a. using specified criteria to suggest improvement of performance of music
 (e.g., “If the trumpets listened to the upper woodwinds, a better balance would be achieved.”)
b. using purposeful movement and drawings to demonstrate an awareness of the aesthetic qualities evoked by music (e.g., drawing or moving to show how the music sounds)
b. using appropriate music vocabulary to identify aesthetic qualities in music and explain personal preferences for a specific musical composition  (e.g., “When the tempo speeds up, it makes me feel nervous”.) b. using aesthetic criteria to compare and contrast music examples to the provided exemplary model (e.g.,  “I liked the second version of the song better, because they sang with more energy”) b. using aesthetic criteria to compare and contrast student performance with professional performance (e.g.,  “We need to work harder to create good balance with so few violas in our string section.”) b. using aesthetic criteria to compare and contrast various interpretations of the same work (e.g., “The grave section from the Bach overture was more Romantic than Baroque.”)

Theater Enduring Understanding 1

Artistic Processes – Theater employs creative problem solving using tools, techniques, and technology in one or more disciplines in order to make the imagined tangible.

Elementary Assessment Targets
Students work with others to create and share simple stories through the development of basic formal and informal scripts, exploring character development, and basic set, costume, prop, and music design.
Middle Level Assessment Targets
Students work alone and with others to create and share or publish stories through the development of formal and informal scripts, characters, and design.
High School Assessment Targets
Students create and share or publish stories through the development of formal and informal scripts, characters, and design.
GSEs for Grades K-2
GSEs for Grades 3-4
GSEs for Grades 5-6
GSEs for Grades 7-8
GSEs for Gr 9-12
HS Extensions
T 1 (K-2) –1
Students show skill development in acting, directing, designing, and scriptwriting by…
T 1 (3-4) –1
Students show skill development in acting, directing, designing, and scriptwriting by…
T1 (5-6) –1
Students show skill development in acting, directing, designing, and scriptwriting by…
T 1 (7-8) –1
Students show skill development in acting, directing, designing, and scriptwriting by…
T 1 (9-12) –1
Students show skill development in acting, directing, designing, and scriptwriting by…
T 1 (9-12) Ext  –1
Students show skill development in acting, directing, designing, and scriptwriting by…
a. engaging in fantasy play; re-creating situations in familiar settings; beginning to dramatize or improvise familiar simple stories from classroom literature or life experiences;
incorporating plot (beginning, middle, and end); and using a tableau, pantomime, or improvisation
a. retelling familiar stories; sequencing story points (what and when), identifying character (who), setting (where), and conflict (why); and beginning to participate in cooperative scriptwriting or improvisations that incorporate the five W’s
 

a. performing and exploring  improvisational activities and describing complex ideas and universal themes in life and literature;  and distinguishing between understanding of text, subtext, and context; writing and perform basic scenes or one-act plays that include a range of character types, monologue, dialogue, action, and setting a. creating basic characters, environments, and actions that exhibit tension and suspense; creating short dramatizations in selected styles of theater (e.g., melodrama, vaudeville, and musical theater)
a. writing dialogues and scenes, applying basic dramatic structure: exposition, complication, conflict, crises, climax, and resolution
a. presenting an improvisation or scripted scene, applying basic dramatic structure (exposition, complication, conflict, crises, climax, and resolution) and including complex characters with unique dialogue that motivates the action
b. performing imitative movements, rhythmical activities, and theater games (freeze, statues, and mirrors)
b. identifying and performing knowledge of basic blocking and stage areas
b. determining the use of blocking  and stage areas, levels, and actor’s position, such as full front, quarter, profile, and full back in
dramatizations
b. analyzing and maintaining a rehearsal script/notebook to record directions and blocking, and design information
b. developing stage directions for  a play or performance based on a script
b. developing and evaluating the effectiveness of stage directions for a play or performance based on a script (e.g., notebook that records reflection and revision throughout the rehearsal process
c. imitating and creating voices and feelings of people, animals and objects in various drama/theater experiences (e.g., skits, puppetry, pantomime, improvisation, fantasy play, storytelling) c. demonstrating basic emotional traits of a character, based on literature, through gesture, action, and voice
c. using effective vocal expression, gesture, facial expression, timing, and language to create character in a comedic and dramatic situation; using sensory and emotional recall, and memorization skills to create a character
c. developing a character using non-verbal techniques (e.g., dance, mime, physical comedy, stage combat (wrestling, sword play, physical confrontation); using basic improvisation in rehearsal to discover character and motivation; developing a character as part of an ensemble
c. developing a character as part of an ensemble using vocal characteristics and techniques, posture, movement, and language necessary to perform an effective characterization; showing text analysis and research to include the physical, social, and psychological dimensions of the characters
 

 

 

c. creating and presenting a character as part of an ensemble from classical, contemporary, realistic, or nonrealistic dramatic texts
d. using and creating simple costumes, props, music, or sets in dramatic activities
d. designing or creating simple costumes, props, music, sets, makeup, or masks, based on literature, in basic formal or informal performances
d. designing or creating costumes, props, music, sets, makeup, or masks that support or enhance character in basic formal or informal performances d. designing or creating, and analyzing costumes, props, music, sets, makeup, or masks that support or enhance character in formal or informal performances
d. designing or creating and analyzing designs that support or enhance the author’s intent, based on text analysis and research
d. designing and creating designs for a play that enhance the author’s intent, based on culture, history, and stage design
T 1 (K-2) –2
Students solve artistic problems by…
T 1 (3-4) –2
Students solve artistic problems by…
T1 (5-6) –2
Students solve artistic problems by…
T 1 (7-8) –2
Students solve artistic problems by…
T 1 (9-12) –2
Students solve artistic problems by…
T 1 (9-12) Ext  –2
Students solve artistic problems by…
a. responding to suggested prompts and solutions a. exploring different strategies/techniques to create stories and environments
a. generating strategies, and choosing one that addresses identified challenge inherent in the story (e.g., “How do we create a boat for Treasure Island using our bodies?”) a. researching and generating strategies, and choosing one that addresses identified challenge inherent in the story (e.g., “How do we foreshadow the antagonist’s downfall?”) a. researching and generating  strategies, and choosing one that addresses identified challenge inherent in the story (e.g., developing a metaphor of the protagonist’s weakness)
a. researching, generating, and implementing  strategies that enhance the story (e.g., analyzing character’s strengths and vulnerabilities and exploiting them in a disciplined and insightful performance)
T 1 (K-2) –3
Students make connections among the arts and other disciplines by…
T 1 (3-4) –3
Students make connections among the arts and other disciplines by…
T1 (5-6) –3
Students make connections among the arts and other disciplines by…
T 1 (7-8) –3
Students make connections among the arts and other disciplines by…
T 1 (9-12) –3
Students make connections among the arts and other disciplines by…
T 1 (9-12)Ext  –3
Students make connections among the arts and other disciplines by…
a exploring the use of body, voice, and imagination to demonstrate an understanding of basic mathematical and social relationships (e.g., use movement and voice to demonstrate knowledge of concepts in addition and subtraction, or create a tableau  that communicates friendship or hunger) a. using body, voice, and imagination to describe concepts in nature and society with emphasis on the five W’s  (e.g., use movement and voice to demonstrate bird migration, or create an improvisation of the founding fathers signing the Declaration of Independence) a. using body, voice, and imagination to demonstrate the analysis of concepts in nature or society  
(e.g., collaborate in small group to study, design, and perform a concept, such as Manifest Destiny)
a. demonstrating analysis of a piece of literature or a social or scientific event by creating a short original dramatization (e.g., a musical scene from S.E. Hinton’s Outsider or a video on cellular mitosis)
a. demonstrating synthesis of a social or scientific conflict by performing a brief original dramatization (e.g., creationism vs. evolution)
a. demonstrating research and synthesis of concepts from literature, the social sciences, or scientific conflict by performing an original dramatization (e.g., Eleanor Roosevelt’s platform speech as a candidate for president in the current time)
b. identifying the unique ways that theater tells a story compared to music, visual arts, and dance b. comparing the common devices for telling a story through theater and in writing (e.g., character, problem; beginning, middle, and end) b. describing how the development of a character, writing a script, or designing a set integrates other art forms b. comparing and contrasting different theatrical performances to tell a similar story (e.g., plays and poetry both built on a journey theme) b. analyzing and evaluating a theatrical performance for its effective use of music, dance, or visual arts b. researching and evaluating how a particular set designer’s visual elements express time, place, and mood (how effectively the set pieces show us we are in a Restoration comedy based on color, shape, line, and placement of set pieces)

Theater Enduring Understanding  2

Cultural Contexts –Theater arts creatively expresses the values and ideas of human experience, community, and civilization. 

Elementary Assessment Targets
Students can recognize that theater arts express unique characteristics based on culture, time, and place.
Students’ artworks describe an aspect of sense of culture, time, and place.
Students can identify different jobs that theater artists hold and the types of skills they use.
Middle Level Assessment Targets
Students can compare theater arts of different cultures, times and places.
 

Students’ artworks adapt an aspect of culture, time, and place.
 

Students can describe different careers in the theater arts and the types of education necessary to acquire them.

High School Assessment Targets
Students can analyze, interpret, and evaluate theater arts within social, cultural, and historical contexts.
Students’ artworks synthesize aspects of culture, time, and place.
Students can evaluate career options in the theater arts industry and identify educational pathways.
GSEs for Grades K-2
GSEs for Grades 3-4
GSEs for Grades 5-6
GSEs for Grades 7-8
GSEs for Gr 9-12
HS Extensions
T 2 (K-2) –1
Students demonstrate knowledge and understanding of the role of Theater Arts in personal, cultural, and historical context by…
T 2 (3-4) –1
Students demonstrate knowledge and understanding of the role of Theater Arts in personal, cultural, and historical context by…
T 2  (5-6) –1
Students demonstrate knowledge and understanding of the role of Theater Arts in personal, cultural, and historical context by…
T 2 (7-8) –1
Students demonstrate knowledge and understanding of the role of Theater Arts in personal, cultural, and historical context by…
T 2 (9-12) –1
Students demonstrate knowledge and understanding of the role of Theater Arts in personal, cultural, and historical context by…
T 2 (9-12) Ext  –1
Students demonstrate knowledge and understanding of the role of Theater Arts in personal, cultural, and historical context by…
a. retelling or dramatizing a story, myth, fable, or fairy tale from two cultures and times
a. retelling and dramatizing a story, character, and design element  drawn from at least two historical/cultural periods a. describing and dramatizing two stories with a common theme from two historical periods or cultures (e.g., freedom, triumph over adversity) a.  analyzing and dramatizing two stories with a common theme from two historical periods or cultures  (e.g., loyalty, revenge, redemption) a. evaluating and applying  historic or cultural techniques to an original story a. researching a cultural, philosophical, ethical, or religious issue described in the theater arts and presenting an influenced original work
b. recognizing how the theater arts are different and similar in different cultures and times
b. describing in broad terms how the theater arts are different and similar in different cultures and times b. identifying specific cultural beliefs and traditions in  the theater arts in at least two cultures and time periods b. comparing and contrasting cultural beliefs and traditions in the theater arts in two cultures and time periods (e.g., Greek theater – comedy and tragedy; Japanese Theater – Kabuki, Noh; American theater – melodrama and musical theater) b. interpreting and evaluating cultural beliefs and traditions in the theater arts in two cultures and time periods (e.g.,  Ancient Greece, Commedia dell’arte, Medieval, Classical and Contemporary, Kabuki theater, African-American, Hispanic, Middle Eastern) b. presenting researched interpretation and evaluation of a particular playwright’s work from a particular period of time or culture and defend the evidence that holds the works together
c. describing ways in which theater, television, electronic media, and film influence their thinking in positive and negative ways c. identifying ways in which theater, television, electronic media, and film influence their thinking in positive and negative ways c. analyzing ways in which theater, television, electronic media, and film influence their thinking in positive and negative ways c. interpreting and evaluating ways in which theater, television, electronic media, or film influence their thinking in positive and negative ways c. researching and evaluating ways that theater, television, electronic media, and film influence their lives in positive and negative ways
c. researching censorship policies and defend conclusion regarding the influence of theater, television, and film
d. selecting or creating appropriate props, sets, and costumes for a cultural celebration or pageant d. designing and creating masks, puppets, props, costumes, music, or sets in a selected theatrical style drawn from world cultures, such as Japanese shadow puppets or Kabuki masks
d. Researching cultural and historical references to design and create production elements d. Performing, designing, or directing theater pieces in specific theatrical styles (e.g.,  by such playwrights as Sophocles, Shakespeare, Lope de Vega, Aphra Behn, Moliere, and Chekhov)
e. role-playing adult professions using creative dramatics and theatrical activities
e. describing the roles of the arts and artist in society to communicate stories, events, and feelings e. describing the roles of the arts and artists in society to interpret events and cultures, to innovate and take risks while solving problems
e. analyzing the roles of the arts and artists in times of conflict and harmony to express disapproval and unity e. analyzing different culture’s expectations and appreciation of the role of the artists in society e. researching a culture’s expectation and appreciation of the role of the artist in society
f. describing a career opportunity and identifying the education required to be an artist f. describing at least two different artistic careers and the education required f. analyzing two different career opportunities and learning pathways to be a professional artist f. analyzing and evaluating a specific career opportunity and determining which learning pathway will lead to that career

        Theater Enduring Understanding 3

Communication – Theater communicates meaning and expression through the sharing of human experience using image, sound, movement, words, space, time and chronology.

Elementary Assessment Targets
Students perform in the Theater Arts applying basic acting, directing, designing, and scriptwriting to communicate their observations, ideas, and emotions.
Students use basic theater vocabulary to describe theater works.
Middle Level Assessment Targets
Students perform in the Theater Arts, applying and analyzing acting, directing, designing, and scriptwriting to communicate their observations, ideas, and emotions.
Students use theater vocabulary to analyze theater works.
High School Assessment Targets
Students perform in the Theater Arts, applying and evaluating acting, directing, designing, and scriptwriting to communicate their observations, ideas, and emotions.
Students use theater vocabulary to evaluate theater works.
GSEs for Grades K-2
GSEs for Grades 3-4
GSEs for Grades 5-6
GSEs for Grades 7-8
GSEs for Gr 9-12
HS Extensions
T 3 (K-2) –1
Students demonstrate the ability to communicate in the language of the Theater Arts by…
T 3 (3-4) –1
Students demonstrate the ability to communicate in the language of the Theater Arts by…
T 3  (5-6) –1
Students demonstrate the ability to communicate in the language of the Theater Arts by…
T 3 (7-8) –1
Students demonstrate the ability to communicate in the language of the Theater Arts by…
T 3 (9-12) –1
Students demonstrate the ability to communicate in the language of the Theater Arts by…
T 3 (9-12) Ext  –1
Students demonstrate the ability to communicate in the language of the Theater Arts by…
a. exploring techniques to convey ideas, feelings, or meaning (e.g., act out as the weather, create a soundscape of a storm) a. identifying  and applying performance and design techniques to convey ideas, feelings, or meaning (e.g., body language and voice that expresses emotions of pride, fear) a. selecting and applying performance and design techniques to convey a range of ideas, feelings, or meaning (e.g., a little sad to very sad; disappointed to crushed) a. analyzing and applying performance and design techniques to convey complex emotions, ideas, or meaning (e.g., betrayal or enlightenment or in aspects of design or writing) a. evaluating and applying performance and design techniques to convey evolving ideas, feelings, or meaning (e.g., connecting particular gestures with phrasing to imply a sense of place and social stature and how this behavior evolves as the character’s life unravels or in aspects of design or writing) a. evaluating and applying performance and design techniques to convey contrasting ideas, feelings, or meaning (e.g., utilizing developed skills to effectively perform tragic or comic roles or in aspects of design or writing)
T 3 (K-2) –2
Students demonstrate the ability to extract meaning from Theater by…
T 3 (3-4) –2
Students demonstrate the ability to extract meaning from Theater by…
T 3  (5-6) –2
Students demonstrate the ability to extract meaning from Theater by…
T 3 (7-8) –2
Students demonstrate the ability to extract meaning from Theater by…
T 3 (9-12) –2
Students demonstrate the ability to extract meaning from Theater by…
T 3 (9-12) Ext  –2
Students demonstrate the ability to extract meaning from Theater by…
a. identifying important character traits and big ideas and emotions told in the story a. describing and interpreting character traits and connecting them to the ideas and emotions told in the story a. analyzing major themes and characters and their symbolic representations (i.e., cultural references) a. analyzing major and minor themes and characters and their symbolic representation (i.e., cultural references) a. evaluating major and minor themes and characters and their symbolic representation (i.e., cultural references) a. researching and evaluating major and minor themes and characters and their symbolic representation (i.e., cultural references) from the works of a particular playwright, culture, or period
b. identifying important techniques that support the story’s meaning (e.g., set design) b. analyzing techniques that support the story’s meaning (e.g., the lighting in combination with the music foreshadowed hope) b. evaluating techniques for their effectiveness and craft (e.g., critiquing actor’s performance and the playwright’s dialog) b. researching and evaluating a particular playwright’s choice of techniques for their  effectiveness and craft in two or more of her/his works

Theater Enduring Understanding  4

Aesthetic Judgment  - Applying knowledge and skills of Theater Arts in order to reflect on and evaluate the work of self and others.

Elementary Assessment Targets
Students read, view, question and identify basic elements of theater arts gaining meaning of the work.
Students write and discuss what they see and value about theatrical productions.
Middle Level Assessment Targets
Students read, view, and make inferences to gain meaning and judge the quality of plays and theatrical production.
Students write and discuss their interpretations of theatrical work.
High School Assessment Targets
Students read, view, and evaluate plays and theatrical productions to gain meaning and judge the quality.
Students analyze the value of theater work in society during discussions and in writing.
GSEs for Grades K-2
GSEs for Grades 3-4
GSEs for Grades 5-6
GSEs for Grades 7-8
GSEs for Gr 9-12
HS Extensions
T 4 (K-2) –1
Students reflect upon, analyze and evaluate the work of self and others by
T 4 (3-4) –1
Students reflect upon, analyze and evaluate the work of self and others by
T4 (5-6) –1
Students reflect upon, analyze and evaluate the work of self and others by
T 4 (7-8) –1
Students reflect upon, analyze and evaluate the work of self and others by
T 4 (9-12) –1
Students reflect upon, analyze and evaluate the work of self and others by
T 4 (9-12) Ext  –1
Students reflect upon, analyze and evaluate the work of self and others by
a. identifying what is seen and heard in a performance using theater vocabulary (real or imaginary people, basic character traits, etc.) a. describing what is seen (e.g., setting, props, costumes, scenery) and heard (e.g., voice projection, diction, pace, and volume) in a performance and comparing that with things known (e.g., time, place, cultural identification, etc.) a. describing what is seen (e.g., setting, props, costumes, scenery) and heard (e.g., voice projection, diction, pace, and volume) in a performance or text and comparing that with things known (e.g., time period, place, cultural identification, etc.) a. analyzing what is seen and heard (e.g., figurative language and imagery) in a performance or text and comparing that with things known (e.g., the playwright, time period, place, cultural identification, etc.) a. evaluating  a play or performances based on analysis of what is seen, heard, and known to judge its value and contribution to humanity a. researching and evaluating  two or more plays or performances that share a common theme, playwright or other aspect, based on analysis of what is seen, heard, and known, to judge its value to humanity and contribution to the theater arts
b. interpreting character’s objectives and motivations based on what is seen, heard, and known to explain character’s behavior b. interpreting character’s objectives and motivations based on what is seen, heard, and known to explain character’s behavior b. evaluating character’s objectives and motivations based on what is seen, heard, and known to explain character’s behavior b. evaluating character’s objectives and motivations based on what is seen, heard, and known to explain character’s behavior b. researching two or more classic character types and analyzing how they have been characterized in theater and comparing the type to famous or infamous actual people, presenting a conclusion
c. identifying technical elements of a theatrical production (e.g., sense memory, script, act, scene, beat, cue, monologue, dialogue, action/reaction, subtext, theme, mood, gesture, rehearsal, design, performance, director, production values, and stage crew)
c. analyzing technical elements of a theatrical production (e.g., playwright, dress rehearsal, run-through, cold reading,
ensemble, proscenium, thrust, and arena staging)
c. evaluating technical elements of theatrical production c. evaluating the production elements of a school or community play or performance and defend the value (e.g., contracts and unions, costs, lighting, ticket sales, logistical plan)
d. identifying the dramatic elements of plot (e.g., exposition, complication, crisis, climax, and resolution) in a script or performance
d. analyzing dramatic elements of a plot (e.g., recurring themes and patterns, protagonist and antagonist, foreshadowing, rising action, catharsis, and denouncement) d. evaluating dramatic elements of a plot for their effectiveness and cohesiveness d. directing a play or performance

Visual Arts and Design Enduring Understanding  1

Creative Processes – Visual Art and Design is the process of creative problem solving using both traditional and innovative media, tools, techniques, and processes in order to make the imagined visible.

Elementary Assessment Targets
Students formulate ideas for creating their own works of art and design using brainstorming strategies, sketching, and journaling; use a variety of media, techniques, and processes to express thoughts, feelings, and ideas; and apply basic art concepts (e.g., line, color, shape, texture, and pattern).
Middle Level Assessment Targets
Students formulate ideas, reflect upon and solve design problems; select appropriate media, techniques relative to intended meaning/expression or product; and apply art concepts (e.g., form, value, space, rhythm, repetition, and balance).
High School Assessment Targets
Students formulate ideas, reflect upon and solve design problems independently; select and defend the use of media, techniques, and processes relative to intended meaning/expression or product; and synthesize their use of art concepts (e.g., hue, intensity, depth, dimension, proportion, emphasis, transformation, and perspective).
GSEs for Grades K-2
GSEs for Grades 3-4
GSEs for Grades 5-6
GSEs for Grades 7-8
GSEs for Gr 9-12
HS Extensions
VAD 1 (K-2)-1
Students demonstrate knowledge and application of Visual Art and Design concepts by…
VAD 1 (3-4)-1
Students demonstrate knowledge and application of Visual Art and Design concepts by…
VAD 1 (5-6)-1
Students demonstrate knowledge and application of Visual Art and Design concepts by…
VAD 1 (7-8)-1
Students demonstrate knowledge and application of Visual Art and Design concepts by…
VAD 1 (9-12) –1
Students demonstrate knowledge and application of Visual Art and Design concepts by…
VAD (9-12)  Ext – 1 Students demonstrate knowledge and application of Visual Art and Design concepts by…
a. identifying and exploring basic VAD concepts: line, shape, form, texture, color, pattern, and contrast
a. describing  and applying basic VAD concepts: line, shape, form, texture, color, organization of visual compositions, emphasis/focal point, pattern, balance/ symmetry, and contrast
a. applying VAD concepts for intended purposes and explaining the effects: line, shape, form, texture, color, color schemes/groups, organization of visual compositions, emphasis/focal point, pattern, balance/ symmetry, and contrast a. applying VAD concepts for intended purposes and analyzing the effects: line, shape, form, texture, space (positive/negative), color schemes/groups, color properties (hue, value, intensity), organization of visual compositions, emphasis/focal point, pattern, repetition, balance (symmetrical/ asymmetrical), contrast, rhythm, proportion, and movement
a. applying a variety of selected VAD concepts for two- and three -dimensional works of art and interpreting and evaluating the effects
a. applying a variety of selected VAD concepts in a series of two- or three-dimensional works of art, and interpreting and evaluating the effects
b. experimenting with a variety of strategies and techniques to address artistic problems (e.g., “What colors will I use to make a cloudy sky?”) b. applying basic strategies and techniques to address artistic problems
b. applying and revising strategies and techniques to address artistic problems
b. generating, applying, and revising strategies and techniques to address artistic problems b. generating, applying, revising, and evaluating strategies and techniques to address artistic problems b. generating, applying, revising and evaluating strategies and techniques to address artistic problems in a series of art works
c. exploring  visual representation based on observation c. using observation to develop a visual representation of basic objects c. using observation to develop a visual representation of a variety of shapes, with some accuracy c. using observation to develop a visual representation of a variety of shapes, with basic proportionality and limited perspective c. using observation to develop a reasonably accurate visual representation of a variety of shapes, proportionally and in perspective c. using observation to develop a highly accurate visual representation of a variety of shapes with accurate proportion and perspective
d. maintaining a portfolio of self-created art work and explaining basic art concepts learned d.  maintaining a portfolio of self-created art work and explaining art concepts learned d.  documenting personal progress through a portfolio of self-created art work identifying strengths and weaknesses
d.  documenting and analyzing personal progress through a portfolio of self-created art work identifying strengths and weaknesses d.  documenting and evaluating personal progress through a portfolio of self-created art work identifying strengths and weaknesses d.  documenting and evaluating personal progress and focus through a portfolio of self-created art work identifying strengths and weaknesses
VAD 1 (K-2) – 2
Students demonstrate knowledge and skill of media, tools, techniques, and processes of Visual Art and Design by…
VAD 1 (3-4) – 2
Students demonstrate knowledge and skill of media, tools, techniques, and processes of Visual Art and Design by…
VAD 1 (5-6) – 2
Students demonstrate knowledge and skill of media, tools, techniques, and processes of Visual Art and Design by…
VAD 1 (7-8) – 2
Students demonstrate knowledge and skill of media, tools, techniques, and processes of Visual Art and Design by…
VAD 1 (9-12) – 2
Students demonstrate knowledge and skill of media, tools, techniques, and processes of Visual Art and Design by…
VAD 1 (9-12) Ext – 2
Students demonstrate knowledge and skill of media, tools, techniques, and processes of Visual Art and Design by…
a.  recognizing and exploring media, tools, techniques, and processes while creating two- and three- dimensional works of art and design (e.g., media, tools, and techniques in drawing, painting, mixed media, sculpture, ceramics, digital media)
 
a. identifying  and using media, tools, techniques, and processes with basic skill, while creating two- and three- dimensional  works of art and design (e.g., media, tools and techniques in drawing, painting, printmaking, mixed media, sculpture, ceramics, digital media)
a. explaining purposes for using different media, tools, techniques, and processes with basic skill, while creating two- and three-dimensional works of art and design (e.g., media, tools and techniques in drawing, painting, printmaking, mixed media, sculpture, ceramics, digital media) a. selecting and analyzing a variety of media, tools, techniques, and processes in creating two- and three- dimensional works of art and design (e.g., mixed media, collage, photomontage) a. selecting and evaluating a variety of media, tools, techniques, and processes in creating two- and three- dimensional works of art and design (e.g., digital media, sculpture, found objects, assemblage)
a. selecting and evaluating particular media, tools, and techniques in creation of two- and three- dimensional works of art and design relative to individual visual arts and design focus
b. Demonstrating knowledge of basic art vocabulary relating to describing lines, colors, and shapes
b. demonstrating knowledge of basic art vocabulary relating to painting techniques and processes, and media, techniques, and processes b. demonstrating knowledge of vocabulary of media, techniques, and processes (e.g., vocabulary relating to printmaking, lino block, brayer/inking)
b. demonstrating knowledge of vocabulary of media, techniques, and processes (e.g., mixed media, collage, photomontage) b.  demonstrating knowledge of vocabulary of media, techniques, and processes (e.g., digital, sculpture, found objects, assemblage)
b. demonstrating knowledge of vocabulary of media, techniques, and processes relative to students visual arts and design focus

Visual Arts and Design Enduring Understanding  2

Cultural Contexts – Visual Art and Design creatively expresses the values and ideas of human experience, community, and civilization. 

Elementary Assessment Targets
Students recognize ways that works of art express unique characteristics based on culture, time, and place.
Middle Level Assessment Targets
Students compare artworks from two different cultures, times and places; and students’ personal artworks reflect aspects of culture, time, and place.
High School Assessment Targets
Students analyze, interpret, and evaluate works of art within social, cultural, and historical contexts; and students’ personal artworks reflect aspects of culture, time, and place.
GSEs for Grades K-2
GSEs for Grades 3-4
GSEs for Grades 5-6
GSEs for Grades 7-8
GSEs for Gr 9-12
HS Extensions
­VAD 2(K-2)-1
Students demonstrate knowledge and understanding of the role of Visual Art and Design in personal, cultural, and historical contexts by…
VAD 2(3-4)-1
Students demonstrate knowledge and understanding of the role of Visual Art and Design in personal, cultural, and historical contexts by…
VAD 2(5-6)-1
Students demonstrate knowledge and understanding of the role of Visual Art and Design in personal, cultural, and historical contexts by…
VAD 2(7-8)-1
Students demonstrate knowledge and understanding of the role of Visual Art and Design in personal, cultural, and historical contexts by…
VAD 2 (9-12) –1
Students demonstrate knowledge and understanding of the role of Visual Art and Design in personal, cultural, and historical contexts by…
VAD 2 (9-12)-Ext -1 Students demonstrate knowledge and understanding of the role of Visual Art and Design in personal, cultural, and historical contexts by…
a. identifying a variety of purposes for making visual art and design (e.g., telling a story, communicating ideas and emotions, creating functional objects)
a. comparing different purposes for making visual art and design (e.g., telling a story, communicating ideas and emotions, creating functional objects)
a. comparing a variety of purposes for making visual art and design (e.g. telling a story, communicating ideas and emotions, creating functional objects, design)
a. analyzing a variety of purposes for making visual art and design (e.g., telling a story; communicating ideas, personal beliefs, and emotions; creating functional objects,; making political and social commentary)
a. evaluating several unique purposes for making visual art and design (e.g., telling a story; communicating ideas, personal beliefs,   and emotions; creating functional objects; making political and social commentary)
a. researching and evaluating a specific purpose for the making of a particular piece of visual art or design (e.g., telling a story; communicating ideas, personal beliefs, and emotions; creating functional objects; making political and social commentary)
b. recognizing connections between Visual Arts and Design and other disciplines (e.g., clothes are designed by artists; scientists study objects by drawing them)
b. describing  the connections between Visual Arts and Design and other disciplines
(e.g., artists communicate historical events; artists explain how things work in images)
b. analyzing  the connections between Visual Arts and Design and other disciplines (e.g., how patterns in design relate to mathematical concepts) b. analyzing  the connections between Visual Arts and Design and other disciplines (e.g., the relationship between music and visual arts and design concepts such as color and repetition) b. Analyzing  the connections between Visual Arts and Design and other disciplines (e.g. ceramics and chemistry, sculpture and physics, designing and engineering) b. Analyzing the connections between Visual Arts and Design and other disciplines
c. Identifying a variety of things that an artist does (e.g. designing shoes, desks, packaging, creating expressive images and sculptures) c. Describing the roles of the arts and artist in society to communicate stories, events and feelings and to design things to work well c. Describing the roles of the arts and artists in society to interpret events and cultures, to innovate and take risks while solving problems c. Analyzing the roles of the arts and artists in times of conflict and harmony to express disapproval and unity c. analyzing different cultures’ expectations and appreciation of the role of the artists in society c. researching a culture’s expectation and appreciation of the role of the artist in society
d. describing a career opportunity in the arts and identifying the education required d. describing at least two different artistic careers and the education required d. analyzing two different career opportunities in the arts and learning pathways to be a professional artist d. analyzing and evaluating a specific career opportunity in the arts and determining which learning pathway will lead to that career
e. recognizing how the visual arts and design are different and similar in different cultures or times
e. describing in broad terms how the visual arts and design are different and similar in different cultures or times e. identifying specific qualities  about  the visual arts and design in at least two cultures and time periods e. comparing and contrasting specific qualities about the visual arts and design in two cultures and time periods e. interpreting and evaluating specific qualities about the visual arts and design in two cultures and time periods e. presenting  a researched interpretation and evaluation of a particular body of artwork or design from a particular period of time or culture and defending the evidence that holds the artworks together

Visual Arts and Design Enduring Understanding 3

Communication – Visual Art and Design is a vehicle for expression and communication through the use and development of metaphor and symbol systems.

Elementary Assessment Targets
Students create works of art using VAD concepts to communicate their observations, ideas, and emotions and discuss works of art using VAD vocabulary.
Middle Level Assessment Targets
Students create works of art using VAD concepts to communicate their observations, ideas, and emotions using adapted symbols and analyze and interpret subject matter, themes, and symbols using VAD vocabulary.
High School Assessment Targets
Students create works of art using VAD concepts to communicate their observations, ideas, and emotions using original symbols and evaluate subject matter, themes, and symbols using VAD vocabulary.
GSEs for Grades K-2
GSEs for Grades 3-4
GSEs for Grades 5-6
GSEs for Grades 7-8 GSEs for Gr 9-12
HS Extensions
VAD 3 (K-2) –1
Students demonstrate the ability to communicate in the language of Visual Art and Design by…
VAD 3 (3-4) –1
Students demonstrate the ability to communicate in the language of Visual Art and Design by…
VAD 3 (5-6) –1
Students demonstrate the ability to communicate in the language of Visual Art and Design by…
 
VAD 3 (7-8) –1
Students demonstrate the ability to communicate in the language of Visual Art and Design by…
VAD 3 (9-12) –1
Students demonstrate the ability to communicate in the language of Visual Art and Design by…
VAD 3 (9-12) Ext–1
Students demonstrate the ability to communicate in the language of Visual Art and Design by…
a. exploring media, techniques, processes, and visual arts and design concepts to convey feelings, ideas, or meaning a. identifying and applying media, techniques, processes, and visual arts and design concepts to convey feelings, ideas, or meanings a. selecting and applying media, techniques, processes, or visual arts and design concepts to convey specific feelings, ideas, or meanings a. analyzing and applying media, techniques, processes, and visual arts and design concepts to convey specific feelings, ideas, or meanings a. evaluating and applying media techniques, processes, and visual arts and design concepts to convey specific feelings, ideas, or meanings a. evaluating and applying media, techniques, process, and visual arts and design concepts to convey a specific feeling, idea, or meaning in a series of work with a common theme
b. exploring the use of colors, shapes, and lines to create a unique expression representing a feeling, idea or meaning b. creating a unique solution for a basic visual art or design problem (e.g., designing or redesigning a toy from recycled materials) b. creating a unique solution for a visual art or design problem (e.g., illustrating the major conflict in a novel or story read) b. creating a unique solution for a visual art or design problem (e.g., designing a percussion instrument that makes several sounds) b. creating a unique solution for a visual art or design problem (e.g., create a researched blueprint design of a renovation for an area within the school)
b. creating a unique solution for a visual art or design problem (e.g., implementing an original renovation design for an area within the school)
c. identifying how visual symbols in everyday life represent meaning (e.g., red traffic lights tell us to stop; packages with friendly cartoon characters tell us that the product is good) c. describing how visual symbols in everyday life represent meaning (e.g. how different clothing styles – street clothes and uniforms – represent meaning; how media advertising persuades consumerism) c. identify how different cultures use different visual symbols to represent similar ideas (e.g., courage, fear, values, freedom, wealth) c. analyzing how artists and designers use natural forms to inspire representations of ideas (e.g., how architects reference local landscape in architectural design) c. evaluating how current popular media, political propaganda, and contemporary artists use visual symbols to represent ideas and values (the visual culture)
c. researching and evaluating the effectiveness of  particular symbols used in current popular media (e.g., a particular advertising campaign directed toward a specific demographic)
d. identifying how their own works of art or design are symbolic representations of  events, ideas, feelings, or beliefs d. describing how their works of art or design are symbolic representations of  events, ideas, feelings, or beliefs d. comparing how their own works of art or design are symbolic representations of events, ideas, feelings, or beliefs within the context of historic and contemporary art d. evaluating the symbolic representations of their own works of art or design referencing a particular historic and contemporary art work d. creating innovative symbols in their own works of art or design and referencing historic or contemporary art d. creating innovative symbols in a series of their own works of art or design and referencing historic or contemporary art
VAD 3 (K-2) –2
Students demonstrate the ability to extract meaning from works of art by…
VAD 3 (3-4) –2
Students demonstrate the ability to extract meaning from works of art by…
VAD 3 (5-6) –2
Students demonstrate the ability to extract meaning from works of art by…
VAD 3 (7-8) –2
Students demonstrate the ability to extract meaning from works of art by…
VAD 3 (9-12) – 2
Students demonstrate the ability to extract meaning from works of art by…
VAD 3 (9-12) Ext – 2
Students demonstrate the ability to extract meaning from works of art by…
a. indentifying subject matter and basic feelings evoked (e.g., a mother loving her child) a. describing subject matter, feeling and broad ideas (e.g.,  American pioneers struggling across the plains to find new homes in the west) a. comparing and contrasting how subject matter, feeling and broad ideas are represented in different ways between different artists (e.g., two works of art that represent heroism from different cultures or in different media) a. interpreting subject matter, symbols and ideas in works of art or design a. researching and evaluating subject matter, symbols and ideas in a work of art or design a. researching and evaluating subject matter, symbols and ideas in a series of art works by a particular artist or designer to determine artist’s progress and influences

Visual Arts and Design Enduring Understanding  4

Aesthetic – Applying knowledge of Visual Art and Design in order to reflect on and evaluate the work of self and others.

Elementary Assessment Targets
Students make observations and ask probing questions to demonstrate an understanding about the process for gaining meaning from works of art and design.
Middle Level Assessment Targets
Students make observations and inferences to gain meaning and judge the quality of works of art and design.
High School Assessment Targets
Students make observations and evaluations of works of art and design to gain meaning and describe the value of works of art and design in society.
GSEs for Grades K-2
GSEs for Grades 3-4
GSEs for Grades 5-6
GSEs for Grades 7-8
GSEs for Gr 9-12
HS Extensions
VAD 4 (K-2) –1
Students reflect upon, analyze and evaluate the work of self and others by…
VAD 4 (3-4) –1
Students reflect upon, analyze and evaluate the work of self and others by…
VAD 4 (5-6) –1
Students reflect upon, analyze and evaluate the work of self and others by…
VAD 4 (7-8) –1
Students reflect upon, analyze and evaluate the work of self and others by…
VAD 4 (9-12) –1
Students reflect upon, analyze and evaluate the work of self and others by…
VAD 4 (9-12) Ext –1
Students reflect upon, analyze and evaluate the work of self and others by…
a. describing subject matter, colors, shapes, and story seen in a work of art or design using affirmative statements
a. describing subject matter, colors, shapes, and story seen in a work of art or design using affirmative statements
a. describing subject matter, media, and basic visual arts concepts seen in a work of art or design a. describing subject matter, media, techniques, processes, craftsmanship, and basic visual arts concepts seen in a work of art or design a. describing subject matter, media, techniques, processes, craftsmanship and relevant visual arts concepts seen in a work of art or design
a.      describing subject matter, media, techniques, processes, craftsmanship, and relevant visual arts concepts seen in a work of art or design of student’s choosing
 

b. making interpretations based on observations
b. making interpretations based on observations
b. interpreting and evaluating one visual art or design work based on analysis of description and when and by whom the work was done b. interpreting and evaluating a visual art and design work based on analysis of description and when and by whom the work was done b. interpreting and evaluating a choice of visual art or design work based on analysis of description and when and by whom the work was done
c. recognizing creative elements in the work c. describing creative elements in the work c. analyzing creative elements in the work c. evaluating creative elements in the work c. evaluating creative elements in the work
d. asking questions about other’s artwork relating to subject matter, colors, and shapes to gain a deeper understanding of the artwork’s meaning (e.g., Why is there so much red?)
d. asking questions about other’s artwork relating to subject matter, colors, and shapes to gain a deeper understanding of the artwork’s meaning (e.g., Why is the girl hiding her face?) d. asking questions about other’s artwork relating to subject matter, media, and basic visual arts concepts  and about when and where the work of art or design was created (e.g., What was going on at the time?) d. asking questions about other’s artwork relating to subject matter, media, and visual arts concepts and about when and where the work of art or design was created (e.g., From which region in the world was the artist?) d. researching specific questions relating to social and symbolic context, how, when, and where the work of art or design was created (e.g., What are important symbols of contemporary Latino cultures?) d. presenting and defending research of specific questions relating to the context of how, when, and where a work of art or design was created and the relevance of the work in historic or contemporary social contexts
e. contributing in individual or group discussions about work in which the student gives and receives constructive criticism
e. contributing in individual or group discussions about work in which the student gives and receives constructive criticism
e. contributing in individual or group discussions about work in which the student gives and receives constructive criticism e. contributing in individual or group discussions about work in which the student gives and receives constructive criticism
e. contributing in individual or group discussions about work in which the student gives and receives constructive criticism
e. contributing in individual or group discussions about work in which the student gives and receives constructive criticism
f. comparing one’s own work with the work of others by recognizing similarities and differences of subject matter, colors and shapes f. comparing one’s own work with the work of others by describing similarities and differences of subject matter, colors, shapes, and ideas f. describing one’s own work for creativity, quality of craftsmanship, effective use of  basic visual arts and design concepts, and choice of subject matter based on the analysis of exemplar works of art or design f. analyzing own work for creativity, quality of craftsmanship, effective use of visual arts and design concepts, and choice of subject matter based on the analysis of exemplar works of art or design f. evaluating one’s own work for creativity, quality of craftsmanship, effective use of visual arts and design concepts, and choice of subject matter based on the analysis of exemplar works of art or design f. presenting an evaluation of one’s own work for creativity, quality of craftsmanship, effective use of visual arts and design concepts, and choice of subject matter based on the research and analysis of exemplar works of art or design

 

 

 

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The Writes of Spring: Reading and Art Show

Friday, March 27th, 2009

Newport Review is celebrating spring with an afternoon of art and writing at Second Stage Studio in Cumberland, RI. Join us from 2-5 p.m. on Sunday, May 3 in a beautiful, historic gallery setting to view photography from Newport Review’s featured photographers and hear Newport Review authors perform their works live.

Matted prints will be on sale at the gallery, and there will be

delicious refreshments and a chance for local authors and artists to

learn about publishing opportunities in Newport Review.

Featured photographers are Eugenia Hepworth Petty, Christopher Woods

and Melanie Faith. A complete list of writers will be announced as

details are finalized.

Don’t forget to mark your calendars for this exciting event!

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