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Archive for January, 2011

PPAC 2011 ARTS Scholarship opportunity announced

Monday, January 31st, 2011

The Providence Performing Arts Center’s Community Outreach Committee is requesting applications to the 2011 ARTS Scholarships program.  Sponsored  by Textron and PPAC’s Annual Fund donors, this program will provide up to $500 in financial assistance for summer arts education programs to each of 25 winning Rhode Island middle school students.

To qualify, a student must

  • be aged 11 – 14 by June 1, 2011
  • reside in and attend school in Rhode Island
  • demonstrate artistic ability, interest, and financial need

Application forms and guidelines are available at PPAC’s website, www.ppacri.org and at PPAC’s administrative offices at 220 Weybosset Street in Providence.  The deadline for receipt of applications at the offices of the Providence Performing Arts Center is 3:00 p.m. on Friday, March 4, 2011.

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An Open Call for artworks inspired by the Brutalist megastructure; the Knight Campus of the CCRI in Warwick, RI

Monday, January 31st, 2011

We Talk About Architecture, Architecture Talks Back 

This is an Open Call for any artist, architect, writer, as well as CCRI alumni, faculty or staff member!

A chance to interpret a building; An opportunity to dialogue with a style

Exhibition: April 5 – 27, 2011, Knight Campus Art Gallery (possibly other locations on CCRI campus in Warwick)
Panel discussion: Thursday, April 14, 2011, during All College Week (afternoon)
Eligibility: Open to artists working within any medium

Extended deadline to submit a proposal: February 12, 2011
Proposal should include name, medium, size and preferably also photo of any existing work that you are submitting and a short bio/artist statement. For a new piece, please submit a description and/or sketch of what you intend to create. Please consult the gallery director if you have any questions.
Deadline for delivering finished work: March 30, 2011

Installation: March 30 – April 2, 2011
Contact information: Viera Levitt, Knight Campus Art Gallery Director and Exhibition Curator, VieraLevitt@gmail.com, www.ccri.edu/art/
Click here to download/print a leaflet

Budget: There is a possibility that a small amount of money might be made available to help cover basic production costs. If you are planning to create a new work and need assistance to cover its costs, please include an itemized production budget.

The Community College of Rhode Island’s Knight Campus Art Gallery director and curator, Viera Levitt, is seeking artworks for a show entitled “We Talk about Architecture, Architecture Talks Back.” Please consider submitting existing artwork inspired by the megastructure of the Knight Campus or create new work in video, photography, painting, drawing, 3D, sculpture, sound piece, dance, oral history, text, architectural model or even a cake inspired by the building created in the architectural style called Brutalist.
You can also contact the gallery director if you are interested in participating in the panel discussion.

The CCRI Knight Campus is the veritable “elephant in the room,” something large, noticed and not spoken about. We will use this exhibition and panel discussion to make the history of the building completed in 1972 and known to Rhode Islanders (as the one they love to hate) while making its effect on those who study and work there visible and articulated.

The Rhode Island Historical Preservation & Heritage Commission described the Knight Campus building as, “an enormous, flat roofed concrete megastructure with semicircular terminus and twin cylindrical skylight funnels set on a hilltop site and ranging in height from four to six stories”. The building was designed by Perkins and Will Partnership of White Plains, New York, in conjunction with the Providence firms of Harkness and Geddes and Robinson Green Beretta. The design was strongly influenced, the report notes, “by the work of the famous modern architect Le Corbusier and has been reviewed extensively by international critics….”. The Rhode Island Historical Preservation & Heritage Commission Report called it “one of the most striking and innovative contemporary structures in the state” due to its prominent location visible from Interstate Highways 95 and 295. But some people call this well-recognized campus destination the “mothership”, some faculty complain about its loudness, many students get lost again and again in its corridors and many consider this like other Brutalist structures, intentionally overwhelming to the individual.

While Rhode Island has been extremely aware of its 17th to early-20th century architectural heritage, it has not been as attentive to structures built since 1950. Yet it is within this environment where most of us live and work. By creating an art project that is in dialogue with the CCRI campus, we seek not only to explore this building afresh, but to inaugurate an ongoing reconsideration of how late 20th century architecture in general and Brutalism in particular affects us all.

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Access for All Abilities Mini Grant Opportunities

Monday, January 31st, 2011

Here’s a funding opportunity for arts and cultural organizations interested in small grants designed to include more people with disabilities in their programs alongside people without disabilities, or to increase access by people with disabilities to existing programs.  Go to

http://www.ric.edu/sherlockcenter/aaa.html for other links.

Access for All Abilities Mini Grant Opportunities

2009 Recipients 2010 Recipients

2011 Grant Cycle

The Paul V. Sherlock Center on Disabilities at Rhode Island College is soliciting applications from organizations and businesses offering social, recreational, leisure and cultural activities in Rhode Island communities for “Access for All Abilities” (AAA) Mini-Grants. The Sherlock Center will award up to four grants in 2011. Organizations may apply for up to $2,500.

Proposals are due by March 18, 2011

The purpose of this grant program is to:

  • Support efforts of Rhode Island leisure businesses and organizations to include more people with disabilities in scheduled activities, alongside people without disabilities.
  • Increase access (physical, financial, programmatic) for people with various disabilities to existing social, leisure, recreational and cultural activities in the community.

Eligibility – AAA Grant applicants must be businesses or organizations offering social, leisure, recreational, and/or cultural activities to the general public in Rhode Island. Non-profit organizations, businesses, city or town government agencies are encouraged to apply.

Review Criteria

A panel of representatives from the Sherlock Center, Accessible Rhode Island and VSA Arts of Rhode Island, including individuals with disabilities, will evaluate applications according to the following criteria:

  • Degree to which proposal will increase long-term accessibility for people with disabilities to leisure activities.
  • Degree to which proposal will result in increased integration of people with disabilities into community activities alongside people without disabilities.
  • Degree to which proposed strategies or projects have a long term impact or demonstrate sustainability.
  • Presence of an effective plan for outreach to people with disabilities which includes marketing strategies promoting the increased accessibility. Applicants may use a portion of the funds requested for outreach
  • Degree to which proposal meets a demonstrated or unmet need.
  • Creative and innovative ideas for combining grant funds with other existing resources for maximum impact.

Examples of supportable projects: purchase or development of specialized equipment or product to enhance accessibility; sensitivity or specific skill training for employees; modifications to an existing activity to accommodate people with disabilities; seed money for a larger project or strategic planning. These are just a few suggestions. We encourage innovative thinking!

AAA grants will not fund:

  • Development of a disability-only program (e.g., “karate for kids with autism,” “dance classes for adults with disabilities,” “hiking for the visually impaired,” etc.)
  • Proposals from entities whose primary client base is already people with disabilities
  • A service or product which will only benefit a single individual (e.g., equipment needing to be custom fit for a particular person, funding a one-on-one assistant, etc)

Timelines:

  1. All grant applications must be submitted online, postmarked, or faxed by March 18, 2011.
  2. Grant award notifications will be sent in writing within thirty days of the deadline.
  3. Project must take place within one year of the grant award (July 1 for 2011/2012 grant cycle).
  4. Grantees are required to submit a report documenting how the grant funds were used within thirty days after the project completion.

Application:
The AAA Mini-Grant application is completed and submitted online. Click the link below to access the form. You may save and complete the form over multiple sessions. To access the form in an alternate format, contact the Sherlock Center at (401) 456-8072.

2011 AAA Mini-Grant Application

For more information or assistance, contact Mary Anne Pallack at 401-456-8072 or mpallack@ric.edu.

The Paul V. Sherlock Center on Disabilities at Rhode Island College awarded a total of $10,000 in “Access for Abilities” mini-grants to five Rhode Island organizations.

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A promo for the VSA arts/RISCA Sherlock Show in the Atrium

Monday, January 31st, 2011

Jeannine Chartier, the Executive Director of VSA arts of Rhode Island, takes a moment to talk about the 8th annual Paul V. Sherlock show, which will be up during the months of February and March in the Atrium Gallery at One Capitol Hill.  The Sherlock show features work by artists with disabilities here in Rhode Island, and is a collaboration between VSA and the Rhode Island State Council on the Arts.

A reception for the show will be held on Thursday, March 10th at noon at the Atrium Gallery.

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Tiverton Four Corners Arts Center seeks Administrative Assistant

Monday, January 31st, 2011

The Four Corners Arts Center in Tiverton, RI seeks a highly organized and motivated Administrative Assistant to the Director for a part-time position.
Approx 20 hrs/week; requires flexibility for night and weekend work.

Fundraising experience will be helpful.

Working knowledge of MS Word and Excel.

Writing skills to draft press releases and other marketing documents.

Salary commensurate with experience.
The Four Corners Arts Center is a registered 501(c)(3) non-profit organization whose mission is to promote the arts at Tiverton Four Corners and its surrounding communities.
Email resumes to info@fourcornersarts.org or mail to:
Four Corners Arts Center
3852 Main Road
Tiverton, RI 02878

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Funding For Theater

Monday, January 31st, 2011

Now Available: Applications and Guidelines for

TCG’s New International Grant Program

GLOBAL CONNECTIONS

ROUND 1 • CYCLE B

ONLINE REGISTRATION and APPLICATION POSTMARK DEADLINE

EXTENDED TO:

MARCH 14, 2011

This program encourages reciprocity and cultural exchange throughout the world—recipients may use the funds to pursue activity abroad or to host international colleagues within the U.S. to pursue unrestricted travel and projects by professionals working in all aspects of theatre.

The grants are offered through two separate initiatives:

On the Road travel grants will award six grants of up to $6,000 each, per cycle, to foster new relationships with international colleagues that will inspire each other’s work and aesthetics by creating opportunities for cultural exchange. This initiative is open to a broad range of theatre professionals from artists to administrators to those in production areas.

In the Lab project development grants will award three grants of $10,000 each, per cycle, to further pre-existing international collaborations by supporting residencies that either advance the research and development of a theatre piece or explore elements leading up to a full production. Projects do not need to result in a final mainstage production.

On the Road grants are not prerequisites for the In the Lab initiative. Previous recipients of other TCG grants are eligible to apply in this program. Both these initiatives will be awarded over two cycles in this inaugural round. Please review the timeline for specific deadlines for each period of activity.

Funded by The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation

Visit the TCG website to register, and to download the guidelines and application form.

www.tcg.org/globalconnections

Need more information? Contact: Mohammad Shatara, Artistic Programs Associate, at mshatara@tcg.org

or (212) 609-5900 ext. 269

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Help Wanted: Island Moving Company

Monday, January 31st, 2011

Company Manager Island Moving Co.
Island Moving Co., Newport, RI’s resident contemporary ballet company, seeks a Company Manager to work with the Artistic Director and Executive Director to manage this professional performing company of nine dancers. The Company Manager handles all schedules and contracts for the Company’s 30 week season, supervises office management and deals with all office technology, including website, Patron Manager interface and hardware. Facility with digital media and Microsoft Office required. Strong candidates will have experience in the performing arts, in production and administration, and a willingness to work within the Island Moving Co.’s highly collaborative culture. The Company Manager reports to the Executive Director and Artistic Director; works with volunteers, bookkeeper, marketing director, production staff and booking staff.
Position will average 25 hours a week depending on production demands. No benefits. Send resume; interviews in February, 2011. Salary and performance review August, 2011. Island Moving Co. PO Box 746 Newport, RI 02840; info@islandmovingco.org.

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Take the 2011 FirstWorks Marketing Survey

Monday, January 31st, 2011

Make your voice heard and claim your winning ticket!

Take the 2011 FirstWorks Marketing Survey

As a valued member of Rhode Island’s creative community, we invite you to participate in an important online survey designed by FirstWorks, Providence’s premiere arts presenting organization.

Your response will help FirstWorks to continue offering amazing ‘firsts’ in the arts to Providence and the region, and will automatically enter you in a drawing to win one of three spectacular prize packages!

Click here to take the survey and to learn about the prize packages: http://campaign.r20.constantcontact.com/render?llr=5wvcfxbab&v=001w_-M_3FUdLepDsMyIIJMsxCnrAiql0k_uoXhnCQAVA6vPYjT3sginQdFVhzaOYW9AR9pLYuQl4McrmmCMb82XH5SnTyGQ95VeEJnw9_clFo%3D#prizes

Thank you for your participation!

Peter Bramante
Managing Director
peter@first-works.org

270 Westminster Street – Providence, RI 02903
tel. 401.421.4278 – mobile. 401.338.5722
www.first-works.org

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Award for Designers and Communications Writers

Friday, January 28th, 2011

People have no idea what goes into a great piece of communication.
That’s where we come in.

If there’s anyone more under appreciated than writers and editors, it’s designers and photographers. That’s why the Magnum Opus Awards exists: to identify and celebrate all the “little things” custom media makers do.

You crafted a coverline that transformed an issue of your magazine from ho-hum to must-read. You wrote a CEO letter that actually made the guy seem human. You did a two-minute video on a shoestring budget that turned out pretty darned good, if you don’t say so yourself.

Well, don’t say so yourself. Whether you pulled these things off on your own or with the help of an outside agency, let us brag on your communication miracle, and tell the world why it’s so good.

Getting recognized for your skills is not a matter of pride—in this economy, it’s a matter of survival. Editors, writers, designers and all professional communicators need to take every chance to distinguish themselves from their peers.

Now in its eighth year, the ContentWise Magnum Opus Awards has given career-making industry recognition to writers, editors, designers and communication managers who do exceptional work, in print, online, in traditional media and social media alike.

Judged by the famed Missouri School of Journalism, the Magnum Opus Awards competition receives hundreds of entries every year in the more than 200 categories that encompass every meaningful area of content-delivery excellence, from illustrations to typography, podcasts to webzines.

It’s true: Nobody understands your work. So let’s make them understand.

ENTRY DEADLINE: MARCH 18, 2011

Go to: http://www.magnumopusawards.com/

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Seeking Proposals for Documentary on Slatersville

Friday, January 28th, 2011

Submission Deadline: 11 February 2011 @ 11:00 AM (EST)

Questions concerning this solicitation must be received by the North Smithfield Town Administrator, at ltetreault@nsmithfieldri.org, no later than February 4, 2011 @ 12:00 Noon (EST).  Questions should be submitted in a Microsoft Word attachment. Please reference the RFP # on all correspondence.    

Paulette Hamilton, Town Administrator, North Smithfield, RI

Note to Vendors:  Offers received without the entire completed and signed three-page RIVP Generated Bidder Certification Form attached may result in disqualification.

 THIS PAGE IS NOT A BIDDER CERTIFICATION FORM

The Town of North Smithfield, Rhode Island is seeking proposals for the research and production of a 10-15 minute historical documentary on the significance of Slatersville, the first “mill village” in America and its contribution to the American transition into the Industrial Revolution.  With this procurement the Town looks to enhance its commitment to historical preservation, community education, and obtainment of National Parks status.   

INSTRUCTIONS AND NOTIFICATIONS TO APPLICANTS:

  (more…)

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Good news from Washington!

Friday, January 28th, 2011

Moira Lenihan-Razzuri, arts staffer for U.S. Senator Jack Reed

When I was down in Washington a couple of weeks ago visiting the National Endowment for the Arts I was also fortunate to visit with two Rhode Island congressional offices.  I visited with newly-elected U.S. Representative David Cicilline, and I also met with Moira Lenihan-Razzuri, legislative assistant and arts staffer for U.S. Senator Jack Reed.

As we have come to expect, the Rhode Island delegation is strongly in support of the arts and humanities at the federal level.  In this, I believe, we are the envy of the nation (or, at least, the envy of all my colleagues at all the other state arts agencies).

It was terrific meeting with Moira, who has worked on Capitol Hill for a good while and knows the “business”.  I definitely left our meeting feeling that this was a person we could call when and if trouble began to brew for the arts.

The other bit of great news came out yesterday.  Senator Jack Reed will be chairing the Appropriations Subcommittee for the Interior.  Before you start to wonder whether this is just good news for Roger Williams National Park and the Blackstone Valley Corridor, keep in mind the following:  the budgets for the National Endowment for the Arts and the National Endowment for the Humanities are bundled within the Department of the Interior appropriation.  So, Senator Reed will be chairing the meetings that deal with these important agencies.

If you get a moment, by all means send Senator Reed a note and congratulate him on this appointment.  While you’re at it, let him know how YOU feel about the importance of federal support for the arts and humanities.

Randy

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Studio-mate Wanted:

Friday, January 28th, 2011

Wanted ASAP: Studio-mate to share 380 sq. ft. studio in the Historic Shady Lea Mill in North Kingstown, RI. This second floor space has refinished hardwood floors, loft storage space, three windows with northern light all day, utility sink, original beams and historic features throughout. Rent is $187.50 per month plus half of utilities which include internet, electricity and heat (in winter months). More info and photos are available upon request.

Shady Lea Mill is situated in a quiet, peaceful setting complete with a river and waterfall in the back of the mill. Sit and read a book, set up your easel to paint, do photoshoots, write a book, or stroll though the picturesque environment sure to stimulate creative juices inside! We have over 40 artists at our mill, come join us!

www.themillatshadylea.com
Contact: imaginecardcrafts@gmail.com

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Writing Contest For Kids, Judged By Thomas Cobb

Friday, January 28th, 2011

The KDMF 8th Annual Writing Contest-Topic Bullying
Narragansett| 1-28-11| Press Release – A masterpiece, a beautiful book, and keenly observed chronicle are just some of the words critics used to describe Thomas Cobb’s book entitled Crazy Heart. Cobb’s profound words helped actor Jeff Bridges win an academy award, and now the Katie DeCubellis Memorial Foundation is proud to announce acclaimed writer Thomas Cobb will be this year’s judge in their eighth annual writing contest.

“We are truly grateful to Thomas Cobb,” says KDMF Executive Director John DeCubellis. “For the second straight year this accomplished and renowned writer is willing to take time out of his busy schedule to support other aspiring writers, while at the same time raising awareness about the KDMF and its efforts.

“After our daughter Katie died at the hands of a drunken driver, we wanted to find a way to carry on her legacy and keep her spirit alive,” says Meg DeCubellis. “As the years progressed we were fortunate enough to receive an outpouring of support and the writing contest is one way for us to give back to others and also raise awareness on important topics like bullying”.

For the past eight years KDMF has awarded money and prizes to students who placed in the annual writing contest. For the 2011 contest the Foundation has a timely topic that could have a profound affect on the writers and readers. Students will write about the topic of bullying…….

The deadline for entries is March 25, 2011. A ceremony will be held Monday May 23rd at 7pm at the Warwick Mall to announce this year’s winners. Television reporter/WPRO radio anchor and children’s book author Laura Clarizio will emcee the event.

The KDMF will present monetary awards to the winners. Additionally, professionally created posters with the winners’ names and writing entries will remain on display at the mall week following the ceremony. For more information about the contest and annual scholarships that the KDMF awards visit the Foundation’s website at www.kdmf.org.

Contact Laura Clarizio
laura@publicitycrew.com
Phone: 617-852-7784
www.publicitycrew.com

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Open Call

Wednesday, January 26th, 2011

This is an Open Call for any artist, architect, writer, as well as CCRI alumni, faculty or staff member!

A chance to interpret a building; An opportunity to dialogue with a style

Exhibition: April 5 – 27, 2011, Knight Campus Art Gallery (possibly other locations on CCRI campus in Warwick)
Panel discussion: Thursday, April 14, 2011, during All College Week (afternoon)
Eligibility: Open to artists working within any medium

Extended deadline to submit a proposal: February 12, 2011
Proposal should include name, medium, size and preferably also photo of any existing work that you are submitting and a short bio/artist statement. For a new piece, please submit a description and/or sketch of what you intend to create. Please consult the gallery director if you have any questions.
Deadline for delivering finished work: March 30, 2011

Installation: March 30 – April 2, 2011
Contact information: Viera Levitt, Knight Campus Art Gallery Director and Exhibition Curator, VieraLevitt@gmail.com, www.ccri.edu/art/
Click here to download/print a leaflet

Budget: There is a possibility that a small amount of money might be made available to help cover basic production costs. If you are planning to create a new work and need assistance to cover its costs, please include an itemized production budget.

The Community College of Rhode Island’s Knight Campus Art Gallery director and curator, Viera Levitt, is seeking artworks for a show entitled “We Talk about Architecture, Architecture Talks Back.” Please consider submitting existing artwork inspired by the megastructure of the Knight Campus or create new work in video, photography, painting, drawing, 3D, sculpture, sound piece, dance, oral history, text, architectural model or even a cake inspired by the building created in the architectural style called Brutalist.
You can also contact the gallery director if you are interested in participating in the panel discussion.

The CCRI Knight Campus is the veritable “elephant in the room,” something large, noticed and not spoken about. We will use this exhibition and panel discussion to make the history of the building completed in 1972 and known to Rhode Islanders (as the one they love to hate) while making its effect on those who study and work there visible and articulated.

The Rhode Island Historical Preservation & Heritage Commission described the Knight Campus building as, “an enormous, flat roofed concrete megastructure with semicircular terminus and twin cylindrical skylight funnels set on a hilltop site and ranging in height from four to six stories”. The building was designed by Perkins and Will Partnership of White Plains, New York, in conjunction with the Providence firms of Harkness and Geddes and Robinson Green Beretta. The design was strongly influenced, the report notes, “by the work of the famous modern architect Le Corbusier and has been reviewed extensively by international critics….”. The Rhode Island Historical Preservation & Heritage Commission Report called it “one of the most striking and innovative contemporary structures in the state” due to its prominent location visible from Interstate Highways 95 and 295. But some people call this well-recognized campus destination the “mothership”, some faculty complain about its loudness, many students get lost again and again in its corridors and many consider this like other Brutalist structures, intentionally overwhelming to the individual.

While Rhode Island has been extremely aware of its 17th to early-20th century architectural heritage, it has not been as attentive to structures built since 1950. Yet it is within this environment where most of us live and work. By creating an art project that is in dialogue with the CCRI campus, we seek not only to explore this building afresh, but to inaugurate an ongoing reconsideration of how late 20th century architecture in general and Brutalism in particular affects us all.

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Help Wanted

Wednesday, January 26th, 2011

UNIVERSITY OF RHODE ISLAND
Position Description

TITLE: Coordinator, Office of Campus Planning and Design

DIVISION: Business & Finance

REPORTS TO: Director of Campus Planning and Design

GRADE: 7

SUPERVISES: May supervise the work of support staff and student(s) assistants

BASIC FUNCTION:

Assist the Director of Campus Planning and Design and the University Planner in the day-to-day administrative and operational functions of the Office of Campus Planning and Design.

ESSENTIAL DUTIES AND RESPONSIBILITIES:

Develop and manage the Office of Campus Planning and Design’s operational systems, including office procurement and office management.

Provide administrative support including the following: arrange and schedule meetings; make travel arrangements; develop and maintain office files.

Coordinate development of Office of Campus Planning and Design website, maintain and update content on a regular basis. Develop procedures to regularly update the Office of Capital Projects, Facilities Services, and other offices. Coordinate with URI’s Advancement Office on communication efforts as needed.

Assist with preparation of space program data, project budgets and other costs estimates, the University’s annual Capital Improvement Projects submission, and other reports as needed.

Assist with preparation of Requests for Proposals for Architectural and Engineering Services as well as processing of responses; working with University and State Purchasing Offices.

Oversee financial administration of the office budget, procurement and accounting paperwork related to office purchases, consultant contracts, and other financial matters.

Handle information of a sensitive and confidential manner; prepare and process routine and complex correspondence.

Serve as facilitator for incoming requests, such as coordinating with administrative, faculty, staff and the external community.

Perform research, develop plans/procedures and prepare routine and special reports as directed.

OTHER DUTIES AND RESPONSIBILITIES:

As designated by the Director of Planning & Design and the University Planner.

LICENSES, TOOLS AND EQUIPMENT:

Personal computers and printers; word processing, spreadsheet, web page, database and scheduling software, fax and copying machines.

ENVIRONMENTAL CONDITIONS:

This position is not substantially exposed to adverse environmental conditions.

QUALIFICATIONS:

REQUIRED: Bachelor’s degree; three years’ experience in an administrative support position that includes work in facilities planning, design, and/or construction; demonstrated proficiency in computing, including database management, spreadsheet, word processing, web page and scheduling software and programs utilizing pc and web-based platforms; excellent interpersonal skills; strong mathematical, analytical and problem-solving skills; ability to communicate effectively orally and in writing; ability to coordinate complex management tasks; excellent time management and organizational skills; ability to interpret and integrate institutional policies, rules and regulations into office operations.

PREFERRED: Work experience in an architectural or engineering office; work experience in a higher education setting; knowledge of LEED® building program; knowledge of construction document formats and standards; experience with accessing information from PeopleSoft® or a similar institutional accounting system.

ALL REQUIREMENTS ARE SUBJECT TO POSSIBLE MODIFICATION TO REASONABLY ACCOMMODATE INDIVIDUALS WITH DISABILITIES.

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Rhode Island Center for the Book at Providence Public Library

Tuesday, January 25th, 2011

Rhode Island Center for the Book at Providence Public Library Announces the 2011 Reading Across Rhode Island Title

The Unforgiving Minute

PROVIDENCE, RI – Follow the life journey of Rhode Island native Craig Mullaney in the riveting memoir, The Unforgiving Minute, this year’s selection for Reading Across Rhode Island 2011.

Co-Chairs the Honorable United States Senator Jack Reed and Providence Journal Reporter Mike Stanton join the Rhode Island Center for the Book at PPL in announcing the 2011 title in this, the 9th year of the statewide read project. Senator Reed has been a strong advocate for libraries for many years and most recently sponsored the Museum and Library Services Act of 2010, which was passed unanimously and signed into law by the U.S. Senate and House of Representatives in December. Mike Stanton leads the investigative team at The Providence Journal. He is a Pulitzer Prize-winner and author of the recent bestseller The Prince of Providence.

About This Year’s Book

The Unforgiving Minute: A Soldier’s Education is the account of a soldier, a scholar and a warrior engaged in a remarkable journey. The Unforgiving Minute also offers the reader a wistful and earnest understanding of a hometown boy, working man’s son, brother, friend, husband and leader. Craig Mullaney paints a compelling and evocative coming of age narrative, reminding the reader about what a miraculous thing a good novel is and how enlightening the experience of reading can be. Mullaney’s determined quest is to integrate his memories while addressing patriotism, control, and the complicated nature of duty, war, and fate. And in doing so, he reminds the reader of the quality of the United States military stationed in Afghanistan and throughout the world, and of what it means to be American—and free.

About the Author

Craig Mullaney has lived in many worlds — Rhode Island, West Point, Oxford University, Afghanistan, and Washington D.C. The oldest of four in a working class family from North Kingstown, Rhode Island, Mullaney learned responsibility at an early age from his mother a pediatric nurse, and his father, a crew chief at the gas company. At Bishop Hendricken High School, Craig gained a strong academic education, discipline studded with extreme physical demands at West Point and Ranger School and was immersed in dialogue and debate at Oxford as a Rhodes scholar. All of his abilities were tested when he was sent to Afghanistan in 2003 as the leader of an infantry rifle platoon. Losing one of his soldiers in combat, Mullaney agonized over the events surrounding that “unforgiving minute.”

In April 2010, Craig Mullaney was appointed senior advisor at the United States Agency for International Development (USAID), a foreign assistance agency. Craig’s position focuses on Afghanistan & Pakistan, assisting in developing infrastructure in support of the government. Mullaney and his wife, Dr. Meena Seshamani, live in Maryland and recently welcomed the arrival of a baby boy, Arjun Mullaney.

Reading Across RI Preview Party

January 27—East Providence Public Library, 7 – 9 pm

Teachers, librarians and book group leaders are invited to attend the free RARI Preview Party kicking off this year’s program. Designed to give book group leaders an introduction to the book and the resources and materials to develop an interesting discussion, attendees will participate in a lively gathering including speakers, music, and a preview performance of Living Literature’s adaption of The Unforgiving Minute.

R. I. General Treasurer and Rhodes Scholar, Gina Raimondo and Honorary Co-chair Mike Stanton will speak at the East Providence Library Preview on January 27. All participants will receive a free copy of the book. Those wishing to attend the preview should register with Louise Moulton: lmoulton@provlib.org or call 401-455-8134.

Other Planned Events: The Living Literature performances are available for scheduling at schools and libraries statewide, by contacting www.livingliterature.org. Craig Mullaney has agreed to be the Keynote Speaker at the annual Reading Across RI Author Breakfast at Rhodes-on-the-Pawtuxet on April 30 and will present to students around the state through the student videoconference on April 29, sponsored by RI Network for Educational Technology (RINET). Registration forms for the Breakfast will be available on the Reading Across Rhode Island web site mid-February: www.readingacrossri.org.

Reading Across Rhode Island is a project of the Rhode Island Center for the Book at Providence Public Library. The 2011 project is sponsored by Fidelity Investments, Reading with Robin, Newport Federal, Penguin Books and RI Network for EducationalTechnology.

Further reading lists, book discussion guides, the author’s website, audio interviews and other supplementary material may be found on the RARI website: www.readingacrossri.org or in print available by contacting Louise Moulton at 455-8134, lmoulton@provlib.org.

###

Tonia Mason

Marketing & Communications Director

Providence Public Library

150 Empire Street, Providence, RI 02903

Phone: 401-455-8090; Fax: 401-455-8001

Email: tmason@provlib.org

www.provlib.org

Like Providence Public Library on Facebook

Follow the Library on Twitter

EXPLORE, DISCOVER, CONNECT today…at Providence Public Library!

Providence Public Library is committed to providing diverse and quality educational opportunities for learners of all ages. We welcome community members to work with us to provide thought-provoking events of interest.

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‘Our Town’ NEA Grant

Monday, January 24th, 2011

Our Town
CFDA No. 45.024
2011NEAOT

Statement of Interest Deadline: March 1, 2011
Invitation to Apply Issued: March 25, 2011
Formal Application Deadline: April 25, 2011

Grant Program Description
Art works to improve the lives of America’s citizens in many ways. Communities across our nation are using smart design and leveraging the arts to create livable, sustainable neighborhoods with enhanced quality of life, increased creative activity, distinct identities, a sense of place, and vibrant local economies. The NEA defines these efforts as Creative Placemaking:

“In creative placemaking, partners from public, private, nonprofit, and community sectors strategically shape the physical and social character of a neighborhood, town, city, or region around arts and cultural activities. Creative placemaking animates public and private spaces, rejuvenates structures and streetscapes, improves local business viability and public safety, and brings diverse people together to celebrate, inspire, and be inspired.”

Ann Markusen, Markusen Economic Research Services
Anne Gadwa, Metris Arts Consulting
From Creative Placemaking

Through Our Town, based on the availability of funding, the National Endowment for the Arts will provide a limited number of grants, ranging from $25,000 to $250,000, for creative placemaking projects that contribute toward the livability of communities and help transform them into lively, beautiful, and sustainable places with the arts at their core. Our Town will invest in creative and innovative projects in which communities, together with their arts and design organizations and artists, are looking to increase their livability, and specifically are seeking to:

•Improve their quality of life.
•Encourage creative activity.
•Create community identity and a sense of place.
•Revitalize local economies.
A key to the success of creative placemaking involves the arts in partnership with a committed governmental leadership and the philanthropic sector. All Our Town applications must reflect a partnership that will provide leadership for the project. These partnerships must involve at least two organizations: one a nonprofit design or cultural organization, and one a government entity. Additional partners are encouraged and may include an appropriate variety of entities such as foundations, arts organizations and artists, nonprofit organizations, design professionals and design centers, educational institutions, developers, business leaders, and community organizations, as well as public and governmental entities. Federal agencies cannot be monetary partners.

In addition, each Our Town project must have:

•A systemic approach to civic development with a persuasive vision for change.
•Clearly defined civic development goals and objectives that recognize and enhance the role the arts play at the center of community life.
•An action plan aligned with the project vision and civic development goals.
•A funding plan that is appropriate, feasible, indicates strong community support, and includes a well-conceived sustainability strategy.
Funding under Our Town is not available for:

•Projects that do not involve a partnership of at least two organizations (one a nonprofit design or cultural organization, and one a government entity) that are willing to provide leadership for the project.
•Activities that are not tied directly to long-term civic development goals.
•Projects where the arts, design, or cultural activity are not core to the project’s plan.
•Capacity building initiatives for artists that are not integral to a broader civic development strategy.
•Construction, purchase, or renovation of facilities. (Predevelopment, design fees, and community planning are eligible; however, no Arts Endowment or matching funds may be directed to the costs of physical construction or renovation or toward the purchase costs of facilities or land.)
•Subgranting or regranting.
•Financial awards to winners of design competitions.
Note: The Grants for Arts Projects guidelines provide additional information on what we do not fund; see “Administrative Requirements” for more information.

Projects
Each project should represent the distinct character and quality of its community.

The Arts Endowment plans to support a variety of diverse projects, across the country in urban and rural communities of all sizes. Projects may include planning, design, and arts engagement activities such as:

Planning

•The development of plans for cultural and/or creative sector growth. This includes activities such as planning for arts/cultural districts and creative industry hubs/districts/clusters, cultural asset mapping, and other cultural planning activities.

•The engagement of artists and/or arts organizations in place-based planning such as community engagement activities.

Design

•The use of design to enhance/revitalize public spaces. This includes design activities such as charrettes, competitions, community engagement, and the development of design specifications for streetscapes, pedestrian bridges, sustainable parks, and landscapes, or for the renovation, restoration, or adaptive reuse of existing structures to be used as cultural facilities or for mixed use purposes (e.g., for affordable housing for artists and others, artist studios, or live/work space).

Arts Engagement

•New arts activities to foster interaction among community members, arts organizations, and artists, including festivals, outdoor exhibitions, innovative programming, performances in public spaces, and activities that encourage the activation of existing cultural and community assets and facilities.

•The commissioning and/or installation of new art to improve public spaces. This includes the commissioning of permanent and/or temporary site-specific public art such as murals and sculptures, sculpture gardens, and waterfront art.

All phases of a project — planning, development, design, and implementation — are eligible for support. Applicants generally should limit their projects to a single phase.

If relevant to your project, you will be required to provide information in accordance with the National Environmental Policy Act and/or the National Historic Preservation Act. See here for more information.

Through Our Town projects, the Arts Endowment intends to achieve the following outcome: Livability: American communities are strengthened through the arts. Applications should reflect the results expected to be achieved by the project. If a grant is received, grantees also will be asked to provide evidence of those results.

The anticipated long-term results for Livability projects are measurable community benefits, such as growth in overall levels of social and civic engagement; arts- or design-focused changes in policies, laws, and/or regulations; job and/or revenue growth for the community; and changes in in-and-out migration patterns. Given the nature of Livability projects, benefits are likely to emerge over time and may not be fully measureable during the period of a grant. If a grant is received, at the end of the project grantees will need to provide evidence of progress toward achieving improved livability as appropriate to the project. Before applying, please review the reporting requirements for Livability.

Evaluation
Grantees will be required to participate in an evaluation of Our Town (see “Administrative Requirements” for more information).

Award Information
Grant Amounts and Matching Funds
The Arts Endowment anticipates awarding approximately 35 grants, based on the availability of funding.

Organizations must request a grant amount at one of the following levels: $25,000, $50,000, $100,000, $150,000, $200,000, or $250,000.

All grants require a nonfederal match of at least 1 to 1.

Period of Support
The Arts Endowment’s support of a project may start anytime between July 1 and December 31, 2011. A grant period is not expected to exceed one year.

No pre-award costs are allowable in the Project Budget. Project costs that are incurred before the project start date will be removed from the Project Budget.

Applicant Eligibility
Partnerships involving a minimum of two organizations (one a nonprofit design or cultural organization, and one a governmental entity) are required of all applications. Additional partners are welcomed.

One of the partners must act as the official applicant (lead applicant). This lead applicant must meet the eligibility requirements, submit the application, and assume full responsibility for the grant.

Eligible lead applicants are:

•County or local (city, town, village) governments. Each application must include a statement from the nonprofit design or cultural organization serving as the required partner reflecting its support for and involvement in the project.

•A public entity or a nonprofit tax-exempt 501(c)(3) organization. Each application must include a statement from the relevant government that reflects its support for and involvement in the project

A government arts agency can serve as both the government entity and the cultural organization. However, these organizations must have at least one additional nonprofit partner. Potential partners for any project may include an appropriate variety of entities such as foundations, arts organizations and artists, nonprofit organizations, design professionals and design centers, educational institutions, developers, business leaders, and community organizations, as well as public and governmental entities. Federal agencies cannot be monetary partners.

The designated fifty state and six jurisdictional arts agencies (SAAs) and their regional arts organizations (RAOs) may serve as partners, but not lead applicants, in Our Town projects. However, all grant funds must be passed on to the other partners.

To be eligible, the lead applicant organization must:

•For an organization other than a county or local government, have a three-year history of programming prior to the application deadline.
•Meet the Arts Endowment’s “Legal Requirements,” including nonprofit, tax-exempt status, as detailed in the FY 2012 Grants for Arts Projects guidelines, at the time of application.
•Have submitted acceptable Final Report packages by the due date(s) for all Arts Endowment award(s) previously received.
All applicants must have a DUNS number (www.dnb.com) and be registered with the Central Contractor Registration (CCR, www.ccr.gov) and maintain an active CCR registration until the application process is complete, and should a grant be made, throughout the life of the award.

Mayors’ Institute on City Design 25th Anniversary Initiative grantees may apply for Our Town, but must come in with a different phase of a project or a different project from that which was funded.

Each county or local government — whether applying directly or as part of a partnership with some other lead organization — is limited to one Statement of Interest and, if invited to apply, one application. Each government must coordinate internally to ensure that only one application per government is submitted. The chosen project from a municipality or region must be identified by a formal endorsement letter from the mayor or county executive. For example, ABC City may submit or be a partner in only one application — not one through the mayor’s office and another through the parks and recreation department. Governments with multiple applications will not be considered.

An application in response to this announcement does not preclude an organization from applying under other Arts Endowment funding opportunities including Grants for Arts Projects. In each case, the request must be for a distinctly different project, which includes a distinctly different phase of a project.

How to Prepare and Submit a Statement of Interest
The application begins with a three-page Statement of Interest submitted through Grants.gov, the federal government’s online application system, no later than March 1, 2011. Following review of these statements, selected organizations will be invited, by March 25, 2011, to submit formal applications. Formal applications must be submitted through Grants.gov and will be accepted through April 25, 2011. The application requirements will be the same as those for the Art Works category in the FY 2012 Grants for Arts Projects guidelines.

Before you submit through Grants.gov for the first time, you must be registered. This is a multi-step process for which you should allow at least two weeks. Registration must be completed before you can apply. See “Get Registered” for details.

Your Statement of Interest document can be a maximum of three pages. Label the top of page one with your organization’s name, address, and the name, phone number, and e-mail of the contact person for the project. Label the top of pages two and three with the name of your organization. Leave a margin of at least one inch at the top, bottom, and sides of all pages. Do not reduce type below 12 point font size. Excess pages will be removed and will not be reviewed.

The document should begin with a one-page formal endorsement letter from the mayor or county executive. For applications from groups other than county or local governments, describe the relationship with the government and its involvement in the project. For verification purposes, include the name, phone number, and e-mail of a contact person with the county or local government. For applications from county or local governments, describe the relationship with the nonprofit design or cultural organization serving as the required partner and its support for and involvement in the project. For verification purposes, include the name, phone number, and e-mail of a contact person with the design or cultural organization.

Follow the cover letter with up to two pages detailing your project. Use the boldfaced language below as headings for each item and organize your response a), b), c), etc. For example, “Budget. The ABC city requests…”

Include information on:

a.Budget. State the amount that you are requesting ($25,000, $50,000, $100,000, $150,000, $200,000, or $250,000). Provide a general outline of the project budget, and describe community funding support for the project and your sustainability strategy. Remember that all grants require a nonfederal match of at least 1 to 1, which must be reflected in your total project budget. For example, if you request a $50,000 grant, the total eligible project costs must be at least $100,000 and you must provide at least $50,000 toward the project from nonfederal sources. If you are invited to submit a formal application, you will be required to provide a detailed budget.

b.Major project activities. Be as specific as possible about the activities that will take place during the project period. Discuss your action plan and the creative placemaking strategies that will be implemented (including the approach to civic development), the anticipated impact on the community’s livability, and, if possible, how the project can serve as a model for other communities. Include information on the location(s) of the proposed activity and any special resources that will be used.

c.Outcome(s) and Measurements. Discuss how your project directly addresses the NEA outcome for Livability: Strengthening communities through the arts. You may also address a secondary NEA outcome (Creativity, Engagement, or Learning) and/or any additional outcomes of your own that you have established for the project.

Detail the performance measurements that you will use to provide evidence that the NEA outcome was achieved.

d.Schedule of key project dates by month or quarter.

e.Partners, key organizations, individuals, and works of art that will be involved in the project. List the partners for the project and note whether they are committed to or merely proposed for the project. (If you are invited to submit a formal application, you will be required to provide commitment letters from each listed partner.) Provide details on the required partners (a nonprofit design or cultural organization and one government entity) and how they will work together to provide leadership for the project. Describe the responsibilities of your other partners and the resources that all partners will provide. Indicate any artists, design professionals, other individuals, or nonprofit or commercial organizations that will be involved in the project, and note whether they are committed to or merely proposed for the project. Where relevant, describe their involvement in the development of the project to date. Describe the process and criteria for the selection of artists, design professionals, organizations, and, where relevant, artworks. Where key individuals or organizations remain to be selected, describe the procedures that you plan to follow and the qualifications that you seek.

f.The target community. Discuss the anticipated engagement with the target community. If actual figures or reasonable estimates can be secured, indicate the number of people the project will serve. Ensure that your estimates are consistent with the information that you provide on the NEA Organization & Project Profile form. Have you worked with this target community before? Has the target community been involved in the planning for and implementation of the project? Describe any underserved groups or areas that will benefit.

g.Discuss how the National Environmental Policy Act and/or the National Historic Preservation Act may impact the project and the status of any documentation that may be required for the project to move forward. If you are invited to submit a formal application, you will be required to provide documentation that the project is in compliance.

h.Plans for promoting, publicizing, and/or disseminating the proposed project, as appropriate.

i.Plans for documenting, evaluating, and disseminating the project results, as appropriate.

j.If this is a continuing project, evidence of impacts achieved for the community. Include any social, cultural, and/or economic impact data so far collected and analyzed.

k.If your organization received a Mayors’ Institute on City Design 25th Anniversary Initiative grant and your Our Town request is for a different phase of the same project, provide as a fourth page a status report on the current project and state when completion is expected.
If any of this activity is included in a current NEA application or award, include the applicable application or award number. NOTE: Organizations may not receive more than one Arts Endowment grant for the same expenses. There can be no overlapping project costs within the submitted budget with other federally sponsored projects.

The Statement of Interest must be submitted as a PDF (portable document format) file. If you don’t already have software to convert your file to PDF, there are many low-cost and free software packages that can do this. To learn more, go to PDF Conversion Programs. Do not create a PDF of your electronic document by scanning. Do not embed images or non-printable media files (video and/or sound) in your PDF document. Please do not enable any document security settings or password-protect the PDF file you submit to us. The Statement of Interest should be no more than 1 MB.

Do not send work samples or supplementary material with your Statement of Interest; they will not be reviewed.

Go to the instructions for submitting the Statement of Interest through Grants.gov.

Application Review
Applications are reviewed on the basis of artistic excellence and artistic merit.

The following are considered during the review of Statements of Interest and, in more detail, during the review of applications:

The merit of the project, which includes the

•Potential of the project to achieve results consistent with the NEA outcome for Livability: Strengthening communities through the arts. This includes the potential:
◦To contribute to the livability of the community and integrate design and the arts into the fabric of community life.
◦For lasting impact and, as appropriate, the ability to serve as a model for other communities.
◦Impact on the community, artists, design professionals, and arts organizations.
•Appropriateness of the proposed performance measurements and their ability to provide evidence that the NEA Livability outcome was achieved.
•Quality of the proposed partnership, including the required partners, and engagement of the private and public sectors in support of the project.
•Appropriateness of the project to the distinct character and qualities of the community.
•Extent to which the project engages the public in planning for and participating in the project.
•Appropriateness of the project to the organization’s mission.
•As appropriate, plans for documentation, evaluation, and dissemination of the project results.
•Ability to carry out the project based on such factors as the:
◦Appropriateness of the budget and its community funding support and sustainability strategy.
◦Quality and clarity of the project goals and design.
◦Resources involved.
◦Qualifications of the project’s personnel.
◦Readiness to meet requirements of the National Environmental Policy Act and/or the National Historic Preservation Act, where relevant.
◦Likelihood that the project will be completed within the proposed period of support.
•Where appropriate, potential to reach underserved populations such as those whose opportunities to experience the arts are limited by geography, ethnicity, economics, or disability.
The excellence of the project, which includes the:

•Quality of the artists, design professionals, arts organizations, works of art, or services that the project will involve, as appropriate.
What Happens to Your Application
All applications are reviewed by an advisory panel. Panel recommendations are forwarded to the National Council on the Arts, which then makes recommendations to the Chairman of the National Endowment for the Arts. The Chairman reviews the Council’s recommendations and makes the final decision on all grant awards. Pending the availability of funding, it is anticipated that applicants will be notified of award or rejection in June 2011.

Award Administration
Crediting Requirement
Grantees must clearly acknowledge support from the National Endowment for the Arts in their programs and related promotional material including publications and Web sites. Organizations that receive grants may be provided with specific requirements for acknowledgment of this initiative.

Administrative Requirements
Before submitting an application, organizations should review the Grants for Arts Projects guidelines and General Terms & Conditions for detailed information on legal requirements, financial reviews and audits, and other administrative matters that pertain to this announcement.

Grantees will be required to participate in an evaluation of Our Town that may include:

•Collection of baseline and post-project profile data about the grantee’s community.
•Use of standard definitions and reports to track and analyze data about the effectiveness and impact of the initiative.
•Participation in surveys, site visits, and interviews, and assistance in publicizing and promoting those data collection efforts as necessary.
Agency Contacts
If you have questions, please contact the staff at OT@arts.gov or 202/682-5091.

Reporting Burden
The public reporting burden for this collection of information is estimated at an average of 4 hours per response for Statements of Interest and 32 hours per response for Formal Applications including the time for reviewing instructions, searching existing data sources, gathering and maintaining the data needed, and completing and reviewing the collection of information. The Arts Endowment welcomes any suggestions that you might have on improving the guidelines and making them as easy to use as possible. Send comments regarding this burden estimate or any other aspect of this collection of information, including suggestions for reducing this burden, to: Office of Guidelines & Panel Operations, Room 620, National Endowment for the Arts, 1100 Pennsylvania Avenue, NW, Washington, DC 20506-0001. Note: Applicants are not required to respond to the collection of information unless it displays a currently valid U.S. Office of Management and Budget (OMB) control number.

January 2011

OMB No. 3135-0112 Expires 11/30/2013

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Public Art Discussion Series

Friday, January 21st, 2011

Public Art Discussion Series
January 26, 2011

PUBLIC ART DISCUSSION SERIES
WHEN:
January 26, 2011
4:00PM – 6:00PM

WHERE:
Channel Café
300 Summer Street
Boston, MA 02210

COST:
FREE ADMISSION
(bar & menu available for purchase)
Sign up today!

CONTACT:
Mary Tinti
Public Art Fellow
mtinti@nefa.org
617.951.0010 x243

Individuals with disabilities desiring accommodations should contact NEFA staff above.

NEFA SUPPORTS ARTISTS WITH GRANTS AND PROFESSIONAL RESOURCES; ESTABLISHES VITAL CONNECTIONS BETWEEN ARTISTS, ARTS PROGRAMMERS, AND THE PUBLIC; AND STRENGTHENS THE REGION’S CREATIVE ECONOMY THROUGH RESEARCH THAT INFORMS PUBLIC POLICY.
Learn more about NEFA.

CONNECT WITH NEFA!

Join us for a series of gatherings in the Boston area to discuss critical topics in public art. Come hear from field experts and peers, network with artists, and participate in the discussion.

THIRD SESSION TOPIC:
Participatory Public Art – What’s Your Story?
The third discussion series will feature twelve short, five-minute presentations of recent participatory public art works by New England artists. Come learn about contemporary work being done by your peers in a sort of happy hour/show and tell. This event will be collegial evening of public art networking and story swapping with colleagues and experts in the field at the Channel Café in Boston’s Fort Point neighborhood. All levels of public art experience are welcome!

Presentations by:
Terry Bastian
Jay Critchley
Ben Ellcome
Peter Geisser & Mika Seeger
Neil Horsky
Kim Radochia
Gretchen Schneider
Paul Simon
Joe Standart
William Turville
Joe Wheelwright
Ursula Ziegler
SIGN UP HERE!
THE 2010/11 PUBLIC ART DISCUSSION SERIES WILL HOST FOUR SESSIONS ON ALTERNATING MONTHS.

Other topics in the works may include public art in private development, collaborating with communities, and a mock panel. For the subsequent session dates and times, visit NEFA’s Events Calendar and check your email for future announcements from NEFA.

This series is sponsored by the New England Foundation for the Arts with support from the Boston Art Commission and generous funding from Anonymous.

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Friday, January 21st, 2011

ONLINE CALL FOR WORKS:
“Signs of Our Times”
-no deadline-

Ivana Rezek :: Rijeka, Croatia
for details on call and entire series of images,
please visit: http://mobius-signsofourtimes.blogspot.com/

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Call For Entries, Newport Annual Curated By Maya Allison:

Friday, January 21st, 2011

Regional artists who are members of the Newport Art Museum are invited to submit their work to the Newport Annual. This year’s juror is Maya Allison, Curator of the David Winton Bell Gallery, at Brown University. Participating artists should submit one ready-to-hang/ready-to-install piece, created over the last year, that has not previously been shown at the Newport Art Museum. Visit our website for submission guidelines and to download your call for entries form .

Dates to Know:

Drop off: Friday, January 21st (10 am – 5 pm)
Drop off: Saturday, January 22nd (10 am – 4 pm)

Notification will be posted online January 26th. Artists will be listed by number under “Selected Artists” or “Non-Selected Artists”. These lists will be available on the Museum’s website or by calling 401-848-8200.

Newport Art Museum
Located in Newport’s Old Quarter
76 Bellevue Avenue
Newport, Rhode Island 02840
401-848-8200
www.NewportArtMuseum.org

NEWPORT ART MUSEUM WINTER HOURS:

Tuesday – Saturday: 10 am. – 4 pm
Sunday: Noon – 4 pm

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